• 19 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, news

    From Barbara Garcia, publisher of Ke Ola Magazine:

    This message is so important, I needed to send out a separate email from the one I sent earlier this week. The latest report on the June 27th lava flow is that it could hit the P?hoa transfer station as early as next week, Sept. 25th, and Pahoa Village Rd. just north of the post office, as early as Sept. 29th.
    We all need to mobilize to get as many boxes and packing materials to Lower Puna as quickly as we can, so our neighbors can get packed and evacuate. The inventory at the stores in East Hawai?i have already been depleted.
    We started a campaign on our Facebook page to collect boxes and have them dropped off at Great American Self Storage in Kailua Kona. We need to keep that going, and also, we could really use help transporting them from Great American to Pahoa Community Center where they will be distributed. They can also be dropped off at Shipman Self Storage in Kea`au. If anyone you know is driving from Kona to Hilo in the next few days, could you please ask them to drop by Great American Self Storage, behind Target, to pick up a load of flattened boxes to take with them? This would really help a lot! We’ve already donated several hundred recycled/reusable boxes in the past week, we want to make it thousands with your help!
    Shipman Self Storage has agreed to be a drop off point as well as a pick up point for those in need, so that?s another option.
    Our friends at LAVA 105 are starting PSAs tomorrow morning, Friday, so we expect the donations to grow quickly, and that no reusable boxes will be taken to the recycling center until every person in Lower Puna has all the supplies they need to get their belongings packed up and moved. Any and all help is appreciated!
    Please k?kua Puna!

     

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  • 18 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, Lava Reports, news

    KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
    19°25’16″ N 155°17’13″ W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
    Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
    Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

    Activity Summary: Kilauea continued to erupt at its summit and within the East Rift Zone, and gas emissions remained elevated. Deflation occurred over the past day, with minor fluctuations in lava level. At the middle East Rift Zone, the front of the June 27th flow is advancing through forest in Kaohe Homesteads, and surface breakouts are also present closer to Pu`u O`o.

    June 27th Lava Flow Observations: The June 27th lava flow remains active. An HVO overflight yesterday afternoon observed that the flow continues heading in a northeast direction through thick forest in the northwest portion of Kaohe Homesteads. The flow front had advanced at an average rate of 290 m/day (960 ft/day) between Sept. 15 and 17, which is slightly higher than the advance rate of 215 m/day (705 ft/day) between Sept. 12 and 15. The leading tip of the flow has narrowed over the past several days, and was 90-140 m wide (300-460 ft) – this narrowing may be related to its increase in advance rate. The flow front was 16.0 km (10 miles) from the vent, measured in a straight line. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) was 18.3 km (11.4 miles). The flow front yesterday afternoon was 2.7 km (1.7 miles) upslope from Apa`a Road. The flow front is still in thick forest, creating smoke plumes as it engulfs trees and other vegetation, but fires are not spreading away from the flow.

    A Civil Defense overflight this morning observed continued advancement of the flow, with the flow front remaining narrow.

    Small breakouts also remain active closer to Pu`u O`o, roughly midway along the length of the June 27th flow. None of these breakouts have been very vigorous recently, but are also producing smoke plumes as they creep into the adjacent forest.

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  • 18 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, news, politics

    From the ACLU Web site:

     

    Read the settlement agreement: 17 Stipulation to Dismiss with Prejudice and Order

    HONOLULU, HI – 9/18/14 – Advocates are pleased with the promise of new rules for free speech activities on state land – including at the State Capitol – in the wake of a federal First Amendment lawsuit, ACLU v. Seki, settled on 9/5/14.

    As part of the settlement agreement, the State is agreeing to wholesale revisions to its rules regarding demonstrations on State property. Effective immediately:

    • Individuals or groups (of any size) wishing to demonstrate at the State Capitol (or other property controlled by the Department of Accounting and General Services (“DAGS”)) no longer need a permit.
    • Demonstrators can have a small table to distribute literature, no permit needed.
    • Demonstrators can get a permit, if desired, to reserve a space, but will no longer have to indemnify the state and will not have to obtain insurance if they cannot afford it.

    The settlement concludes a lawsuit filed by the ACLU of Hawaii Foundation (“ACLU”) and the law firm of Chun Kerr, LLP (“Chun Kerr”) on behalf of plaintiffs Pamela G. Lichty and the ACLU in March 2014, documenting burdensome requirements for obtaining a permit – including requirements that small groups get the government’s permission before holding a protest; that individuals have to agree to indemnify the State for any injuries arising from their protest (even if the injuries are caused by the protesters’ opponents); and that individuals or groups apply for a permit weeks in advance (with no exception for spontaneous demonstrations in response to sudden events or news). The ACLU had been trying to resolve these issues with the State informally since 2010, but the State did not agree to change these permitting requirements until after the lawsuit was filed.

    Pamela G. Lichty, President of the Drug Policy Action Group, whose organization ran up against these regulations while planning a rally at the Capitol said: “This settlement is a win for freedom of speech, and for grassroots organizations like ours that need to respond to current events quickly and without layers of government bureaucracy getting in the way of our message.”

    Attorney Alexandra Rosenblatt of Chun Kerr said: “Objective, consistent standards for access to Hawaii’s public spaces will better safeguard equal treatment and equal protection for all community voices – a critical responsibility of government. We are relieved that DAGS will now have policies that uphold the rights to free speech and assembly as guaranteed in the First Amendment”

    For more information about use of government property for demonstrations, and permitting, please see the ACLU of Hawaii’s First Amendment Toolkit: http://acluhi.org/know-your-rights/first-amendment-toolkit/#QRpermit

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  •  From http://www.agroforestrydesign.net :

    Agroforestry Solutions for Hilo-H?m?kua Districts

    A free evening presentation at UH-Hilo by Dave Sansone, agroforestry consultant

    Date: Friday, September 19th, 2014
    Time: 7 pm
    Location: UH-Hilo, University Classroom Building (UCB), Room 100
    Sponsored by: UH-Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management (CAFNRM)
    and Agroforestry Design, LLC

    Rampant weeds, acidic soil, nutrient leaching (loss) from heavy rain, erosion and deforestation are some the issues that Hilo and Hamakua farmers and gardeners face. Dave Sansone, agroforestry consultant and owner of Agroforestry Design.net, will be offering a free slideshow presentation called “Agroforestry Solutions for Hilo and H?m?kua Districts”, on Friday, September 19th at 7pm at UH-Hilo, UCB Room 100.   Uncommon and rare plant prizes.

    Hilo and H?m?kua Districts have a diversity of growing conditions including various soil types, elevations, rainfall patterns and totals; yet there are a number agroforestry practices that can be adapted to help farmers and gardeners overcome each area’s challenges and limitations. “Agroforestry, is the targeted integration of agriculture and forestry crops and practices, and can be used to win the war on weeds, increase fertility and production, improve soil quality and plant health, recycle nutrients, trap erosion, and reduce reliance on outside inputs”, says Sansone.

    One of the most common challenges are the many weeds that never seem to take a break, especially in the warm high humidity and rainfall areas. A number of the more noxious weeds such as wainaku or hono hono will grow if they are dropped on the ground. No spray farms and gardens usually struggle in these conditions and often resort to mowing, weed whacking, or importing mulch to keep weeds down.

    Rather than fighting a never ending battle against the weeds, agroforestry can empower people to “succeed the weeds” by planting a mix of fast growing food plants, nitrogen fixing tree and shrub (NFTS) hedgerows that eliminate weeds, especially through shading and mulch created by severely pruning hedgerows. This system has been shown to reduce leaching, recycle nutrients, and increase available fertility and organic matter.

    Well-designed rapid growing acid tolerant polycultures such as cow pea or other vigorous legumes, cassava, pigeon pea (aka Gandudi bean or Cajan Cajanus), and banana can quickly shade and mulch out low growing weed seedlings while NFTS hedgerows become established. This can offer early, reliable production with minimal inputs or effort after established.

    Occasional alleys can utilize strategic companion planting of grains, beans, roots, shrubs, crop trees, and overstory trees in intercrop rows between the NFTS hedgerows. Shade loving and tolerant plants can be added later including cardamom or maile. This model offers increasing production while reducing effort and inputs along with biological weed control while reducing the amount of land needed to grow vegetables and tree crops. Slow growing spice and exotic fruit crops command high prices due to the time it takes to reach maturity, but farmers who integrate them into diverse farms can adapt operations to have continuous production while the high value trees grow.

    Acidic soil due to leaching of calcium, sodium and magnesium by heavy rain is a more complex issue. While agricultural lime can raise the pH, it is a short term solution that is largely dependent on outside inputs. It seems that acidic soils have been a major limiting factor here for thousands of years. To learn more about new and traditional agroforestry solutions to overcome acid soils and other challenges that Hilo and H?m?kua farmers and gardeners face, attend “Agroforestry Solutions for Hilo and H?m?kua Districts”.

    More information is available at www.agroforestrydesign.net/events

    About the presenter: Dave Sansone is owner of Agroforestry Design.net, LLC which offers agroforestry and permaculture consultation and research and services on Hawai’i Island. He has been developing restoration agroforestry models since 2002 and has worked with over 1,000 species of plants in a diversity of climates, conditions, and cultivation systems.   Dave promotes agroforestry models that integrate site adapted species, perennials, native species, and endangered species as a way to effectively address the 6th Great Extinction, climate change, and increasing population while growing the best food possible.  He has offered inspiring and informative presentations at numerous venues including conferences, universities, and colleges.

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  • 17 Sep 2014 /  Uncategorized

    CleaningPartyplanning is sponsoring  pot luck and food drive for Puna Disaster Relief  on Thursday, September 18,  10:30-2Pm at Keaau Park.    All foods and aid are welcome, and will be distributed at the event  that day.  To volunteer, call (808)430-5130.

  • 17 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, news

    KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
    19°25’16″ N 155°17’13″ W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
    Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
    Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

    Activity Summary: Kilauea continued to erupt at its summit and within the East Rift Zone, and gas emissions remained elevated. Slight deflation occurred over the past day, with minor fluctuations in lava level. At the middle East Rift Zone, the front of the June 27th flow is advancing through forest in Kaohe Homesteads, and surface breakouts are also present closer to Pu`u O`o.

    June 27th Lava Flow Observations: The June 27th lava flow remains active. A Civil Defense overflight this morning observed that the flow continues heading in a northeast direction through thick forest in the northwest portion of Kaohe Homesteads. The flow front had advanced at an average rate of 270 m/day (890 ft/day) between Sep 15 and 17, which is slightly higher than the advance rate of 215 m/day (705 ft/day) between Sept. 12 and 15. The flow front was 15.9 km (9.9 miles) from the vent, measured in a straight line. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) was 18.2 km (11.3 miles). The flow front this morning was 2.8 km (1.7 miles) upslope from Apa`a Road. The flow front is still in thick forest, creating smoke plumes as it engulfs trees and other vegetation, but fires are not spreading away from the flow.

    Small breakouts also remain active closer to Pu`u  O`o, roughly midway along the length of the June 27th flow. None of these breakouts have been very vigorous recently, but are also producing smoke plumes as they creep into the adjacent forest.

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  • 17 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, news

    From Hawaii County Civil Defense:

    This is an Eruption and Lava Flow Information Update for Wednesday September 17th at 8:00 AM.

    Daily over flights and assessments are continuing. This morning’s assessment shows the surface lava flow continues towards the northeast and has advanced approximately 350 yards since yesterday. The active edge of the surface flow is moving through the upper northwest corner of the Kaohe Homesteads and across vacant forested parcels. The leading edge or front of the flow is approximately 100 yards wide. Currently the flow does not pose an immediate threat to area communities and area residents will be given adequate notice to safely evacuate should that be necessary. There is no brush fire threat at this time and all burning is limited to the vegetation that is in direct contact with the flow. Smoke conditions were moderate to heavy this morning over the Kaohe area and may vary depending on wind conditions.

    Construction activities on the Railroad Avenue and Government Beach Road are continuing. These activities are to establish alternate road access in the event Highway 130 is affected by the lava flow.

    The public is reminded that the flow cannot be accessed and is not visible from any public areas. Access to the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision will be restricted and limited to subdivision residents only. Everyone’s cooperation and assistance is greatly appreciated.

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  • 14 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, Lava Reports, news

    Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
    Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

    Activity Summary: K?lauea continued to erupt at its summit and within the East Rift Zone, and gas emissions remained elevated. Summit inflation continued, with only slight fluctuations in lava level. At the middle East Rift Zone, the front of the June 27th flow continues to advance through forest near Kaohe Homesteads, and surface breakouts are also present closer to Pu?u ????.

    June 27th Lava Flow Observations: The June 27th lava flow remains active. A Civil Defense overflight this morning observed that the flow front was moving in a more northward direction over the past day, which is a slight shift from its previous northeast direction. The flow had traveled roughly 270 m (300 yards) since Friday, suggesting that the flow advance rate may have slowed over the past several days. The flow front remains close to the boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve and Kaohe Homesteads. The flow front is still in thick forest, creating smoke plumes as it engulfs trees and other vegetation, but fires are not spreading away from the flow.

    The most recent HVO overflight was Friday afternoon. The flow front at that time was 14.9 km (9.3 miles) from the vent, measured in a straight line, and 170 m (0.1 miles) from the Forest Reserve/Kaohe Homesteads boundary. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) was 17.1 km (10.6 miles). Between September 10 and 12 the advance rate was approximately 250 meters (270 yards) per day.

    Small breakouts also remain active closer to Pu?u ????, roughly midway along the length of the June 27th flow. None of these breakouts have been very vigorous recently, but are also producing smoke plumes as they creep into the adjacent forest.

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  • 13 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, Hurricane, news

    Even as Puna braces for the lava flow, groups such as Hawaii Habitat for the Humanities are still working on cleanup and rebuilding  in the wake of Tropical Storm Iselle.  Janice Ikeda Bueltman of Hawaii Island United Way relays the appeal below. –ADM

    “Volunteer help is still needed. If you or someone you know is available to help with tree/debris removal or to help with home repair, please fill out the attached form and fax, email or send to Habitat For Humanity. MAHALO!”
    FAX: (808)331-8020
    EMAIL: info@habitatwesthawaii.org
    MAIL:
    Habitat for Humanity West Hawaii
    PO Box 4619
    Kailua-Kona, HI 96745

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  • 12 Sep 2014 /  Uncategorized

    (Media release) Following is

    Mayor Billy Kenoi statement on President Obama’s Hawaii Disaster Declaration:

    “We want to thank President Obama, Governor Abercrombie, and all those who worked on this request for assistance to restore our public infrastructure following Tropical Storm Iselle,” said County of Hawai?i Mayor Billy Kenoi. “This federal assistance will help us to repair public facilities and mitigate future hazards. However, individual assistance for our residents and homeowners is also needed, and our team continues to work with the state on our appeal to convince FEMA to reconsider our request for individual assistance.”

  • 12 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, news

    The June 27th lava flow remains active. A Civil Defense overflight yesterday at 12:30 pm showed the flow front was still moving in a general northeast direction, bringing it closer to the western boundary of Kaohe Homesteads (which is the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve). The flow front at that time was 14.8 km (9.2 miles) from the vent, measured in a straight line, and 0.3 km (0.2 miles) from the Forest Reserve/Kaohe Homesteads boundary. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 16.9 km (10.5 miles). Between September 6 and 10, the flow front advanced at approximately 400 meters (460 yards) per day. Between September 10 and 11 the advance rate dropped slightly to approximately 300 meters (330 yards) per day. The flow front is still in thick forest, creating smoke plumes as it engulfs trees and other vegetation, but fires are not spreading away from the flow.

    Small breakouts also remain active closer to Pu?u ????, roughly midway along the length of the June 27th flow. None of these breakouts have been very vigorous recently, but are also producing smoke plumes as they creep into the adjacent forest.

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  • 11 Sep 2014 /  Uncategorized

    (Media release) —
    A Lava Flow Informational Fair will be held on Saturday, September 13, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., at the P?hoa High School Cafeteria.

    Representatives from public agencies, private companies, and community groups will be on hand to answer questions about transportation, moving, storage, insurance, finances, legal matters, health care, and more.

    For more information on the Lava Flow Informational Fair, call Hawai‘i County Civil Defense at (808) 935-0031.

  • 11 Sep 2014 /  commentary, news

    by Alan McNarie

     

    Yesterday, before peddling down the hill to spend the day in Hilo dealing with the Social Security bureaucracy,   I dashed off a quick post on Facebook:

    “Here’s a little ‘outside the box’ idea: if the Pahoa Highway gets cut, what are the possibilities of establishing a ferry service or water taxi between, say, Pohoiki and Hilo? Has anyone considered this as at least a temporary alternative?”

    By the end of the day, the post had drawn 25 “likes” and well over 50 comments, including one that tagged Shane Turpin of Lava Ocean Adventures.  Turpin took the idea and ran with it, e-mailing the county a proposal to use his catamaran, which seats 49, to run a ferry service between Pohoiki and Hilo, taking  about an hour each way. By yesterday evening, Turpin had set up a new Facebook page,  Lavaocean Transport, to support the idea.  Within three hours of its introduction, it had 70 members.  Turpin said he hadn’t heard back from the County yet, but one resident reported  that last night, at a meeting with Pahoa merchants about the lava crisis, Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira mentioned that he was “in touch” with Turpin.

    The county and state have focused mostly on selecting and establishing an alternate land route–which they have been debating, without accomplishing, ever since I moved here  from Missouri, 26 years ago, and just finally began construction on today.  Meanwhile, the ferry service  isn’t the only outside-the-box idea that’s floating around out there.  Hawaii’s  citizens are proposing everything from zip lines to hovercraft to converting  the Pahoa bypass into an airstrip.  Some of those ideas aren’t practical of course. But some, like the boat service and the air strip, are probably doable much faster than the alternate land route.  Shortly after moving here, my then-wife and I drove our Ram-50 pickup from Kapoho to Hilo via Old Government Beach Road and Railroad Avenue, but we had to drive over 5-foot saplings to do it.  Those saplings have since had a quarter-century to turn into trees. It’s taken us over a month just to clear fallen albizia limbs off existing roads in the wake of Tropical Storm Iselle, and  the job’s still not completely done.  Forty-nine boat commuters aren’t going to compensate for a highway that carries 7,000 cars a day, but if we can get a few more boats on board and have hourly departures, and it could make a dent–especially when the replacement for that highway is dirt road.

    I’ve just finished a long article for our print edition, about near miraculous mobilization of government agencies, non-profits, businesses and community volunteers formed in  the wake  of Tropical Storm Iselle.  Almost overnight, hundreds of people, many of whom had never even met before, formed an ad-hoc network  that flooded tons of food, ice and volunteers into the stricken communities.  Big factors in that effort were the social media and Facebook pages such as  Iselle Recovery Assistance–Offers and Requests, which allowed ideas and information  to spread almost instantly, uniting those in need with those who could help.  Oft-fractious Puna proved, in a spectacular fashion, what it could do when it pulled together.

    We need to do that again.  Unfortunately, with the slow-motion emergency that is lava’s nature,  our natural fractiousness has had time to assert itself again in some of those numerous public meetings that the county has organized.  But one of the things I’ve always loved about this place is its huge reserve of  creativity; there’s more imagination abroad in little Pahoa than in the entirety of  Kansas City or St. Louis.  Out there in the community, ideas are moving at the speed of light.  Can our ponderous bureaucracy keep up?

    Unfortunately, what moves slower than lava?  Bureaucracy.

    (He says with a sigh, as he embarks on his third day of trying to get one Social Security form filed.)

  • 11 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, news

    From Hawaii County Civil Defense:

    This is an Eruption and Lava Flow Information Update for Thursday  September 11th at 10:00 AM.

    The current assessment shows the surface lava flow has shifted towards the east and is moving in an east/northeast direction.  The surface flow has advanced approximately 300 yards since yesterday.  Presently the leading edge of the surface flow is located approximately 0.3 miles from the northwest or upper corner of the Wao Kele Forest Reserve and Kaohe homesteads boundary.   Currently the flow does not pose and immediate threat to area communities however residents of the Kaohe Subdivision are advised to monitor the local radio broadcasts for further updates and for possible evacuation instructions if conditions change.  Residents will be given adequate notice to safely evacuate should that be necessary.  Personnel of the Civil Defense Office will be conducting door to door surveys and notification in the Kaohe Homesteads starting today.

    Residents in the subdivisions of Hawaiian Beaches and Hawaiian Paradise Park are advised that construction activities on the Railroad Avenue and Government Beach Road will be starting today and running continuously through the weekend and next week.  These activities are to establish alternate road access in the event Highway 130 is affected by the lava flow.

    The public is reminded that the flow cannot be accessed and is not visible from any public areas.  Access to the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision will be restricted and limited to subdivision residents only.

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  • 11 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, news

    KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
    19°25’16″ N 155°17’13″ W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
    Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
    Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

    Activity Summary: K?lauea continued to erupt at its summit and within the East Rift Zone, and gas emissions remained elevated. Summit inflation continued, with a slight rise in lava level. At the middle East Rift Zone, the front of the June 27th flow continues to advance through forest near Kaohe Homesteads, and surface breakouts are also present closer to Pu?u ????.

    June 27th Lava Flow Observations: The June 27th lava flow remains active. An HVO overflight yesterday afternoon observed that the flow front had shifted towards a more northeast direction, bringing it closer to the western boundary of Kaohe Homesteads (which is the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve). The flow front at 2:45 pm yesterday was 14.5 km (9.0 miles) from the vent, measured in a straight line, and 0.6 km (0.4 miles) from the Forest Reserve/Kaohe Homesteads boundary. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube axis (so that bends in the flow are considered) is 16.6 km (10.3 miles). Between September 6 and 10, the flow front has advanced at approximately 400 meters (460 yards) per day. The flow front is still in thick forest, creating smoke plumes as it engulfs trees and other vegetation, but fires are not spreading away from the flow.

    Small breakouts also remain active closer to Pu?u ????, roughly midway along the length of the June 27th flow. None of these breakouts have been very vigorous recently, but are also producing smoke plumes as they creep into the adjacent forest.

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  • 10 Sep 2014 /  BULLETINS, news

    Issued: Wednesday, September 10, 2014, 7:21 PM HST (20140911/0521Z)
    Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
    Notice Number: 2014/H3
    Location: N 19 deg 25 min W 155 deg 17 min
    Elevation: 4091 ft (1247 m)
    Area: HI Hawaii and Pacific Ocean

    Volcanic Activity Summary: Between September 6 and 10, the June 27th flow advanced north then northeastward at an average rate of 400 m/d (0.25 mi/d). In this way, the flow had advanced approximately 14.5 km (9.0 miles straight-line distance) from the vent, or to within 0.6 km (0.4 miles) of the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve, by the afternoon of September 10. At the average rate of advancement of 400 m/day (0.25 mi/day) since September 6, we project that lava could flow from its current location to the northwest edge of Kaohe Homesteads in 1.5 days and to the Pahoa Village road (government road) in Pahoa within 14-16 days if lava is not further confined within the cracks and down-dropped blocks within the East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano. These estimates will be continually refined as we track this lava flow.

    Kaohe Homesteads is located between the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve and the town of Pahoa in the Puna District of the County of Hawai`i.

    Recent Observations:
    [Lava flow] Lava flow turned to the northeast and is advancing at a rate of 400 m/day (0.25 mi/day).

    Hazard Analysis:
    [Lava flow] Lava Flow from Pu‘u ‘O‘o vent could reach the northwest edge of Kaohe Homesteads in 1.5 days and the government road in P?hoa within 14-16 days.

    Remarks: The Pu‘u ‘O‘o vent in the East Rift Zone of K?lauea Volcano began erupting on January 3, 1983, and has continued erupting for more than 31 years, with the majority of lava flows advancing to the south. Over the past two years, lava flows have issued from the vent toward the northeast. The June 27th flow is the most recent of these flows and the first to threaten a residential area since 2010-2011. On June 27, 2014, new vents opened on the northeast flank of the Pu‘u ‘O‘o cone that fed a narrow lava flow to the east-northeast. On August 18, the flow entered a ground crack, traveled underground for several days, then resurfaced to form a small lava pad. The sequence was repeated three more times over the following days with lava entering and filling other cracks before reappearing at the surface, in two of the cases farther downslope. Lava emerged from the last crack on September 6 and moved as a surface flow to the northeast.

    Contacts: HVO media contact
    askHVO@usgs.gov

    Next Notice: A new VAN will be issued if conditions change significantly or alert levels are modified. While this VAN is in effect, regularly scheduled updates are posted at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/activity/kilaueastatus.php

    SEE MAP

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