• 25 Mar 2011 /  Uncategorized

    The Napau Fire is 50% contained.  Firefighters experienced very little fire activity due to lighter than expected trade winds and light rain; and, there was no increase in acreage.  Approximately 2,076 acres have burned.   Due to favorable weather, firefighters were able to hold the southern spread of the fire and cool (cold trail) hot spots 50’ into the burn. Firefighters on the north perimeter accomplished similar work with no fire spread.  The Napau Fire is approximately seven miles southeast of the Kilauea Visitor Center, located on the east rift of Kilauea Volcano.  It is a lava caused wildfire resulting from the March 5, 2011, Kamoamoa Fissure Eruption.  
     
    Strategy:  The continued priority is to protect the East Rift SEA, on the north perimeter of the fire.  Two additional Kipukas, islands of vegetation, have been identified as protection priorities.  The Kealakomo and Naula SEAs are on the south side of the Chain of Craters Road.  The prime objective is to confine the fire to the current perimeter and acreage.  Firefighter and visitor safety is always the number one objective.  Rough terrain, obscure holes, standing dead trees and other hazards exist.  There have been no injuries on this fire.
     
    Values to be protected: All fires pose significant threats to the ecological health of the park, which are not fire adaptive, and will be put out.  A high priority fire protection goal is the east rift Special Ecological Area (SEA), an intact lowland rain forest, which has been intensively managed to exclude invasive species and protect and restore highly valued native plant and animal communities.   Protected over decades by Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, the rain and mesic forests threatened by the spread of the Napau Fire are home to plants, birds, bugs, spiders, and bats found only in Hawai’i.  They include the endangered Hawaiian  bat (`ope`ape`a)  Hawaiian hawk,(`io) and other uniquely Hawaiian plants and animals such as Hawaiian thrush, (`oma`o),  lama and sandalwood trees, happyface spiders, carnivorous caterpillars, and Hawaiian honeycreepers (`apapane and `amakihi).  National park and USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) infrastructures, monitoring equipment, and other visitor features near the fire are also being protected.
     
    Fire Resources:  Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park firefighters are being augmented with NPS fire crews from Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, Olympic and Yosemite National Parks (NPS), the Pacific West Regional Office of NPS, National NPS Fire Office in Boise and the USDA Forest Service (Eldorado, Sequoia, Stanislaus and Los Padres National Forests in CA.); 50 firefighters, fire management staff and park resource advisors are committed.
     
    Air and Smoke:  Trade winds continued to blow with less intensity, and they were accompanied with frequent rain showers.  Smoke was not visible along the Chain of Craters Road.   There are no active lava flows in the park.  Although the flow has “stagnated”, it still has the potential to ignite surrounding vegetation.  In addition to smoke, air quality is constantly monitored in regards to sulfur dioxide emissions from volcanic activity. Fire managers will continue to coordinate fire efforts with USGS HVO scientists regarding eruption activity and air quality.  
     
    Closures:  The Chain of Craters Road is re-opened.  Drivers are urged to be diligent while driving, particularly near the hair-pin turn, as firefighters and fire engines are on the road.  
     
    Partners Involved:  US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and USDA Forest Service.
     
    Additional Information and Contacts:  
    Hawai’i Volcanoes Webpage:   http://www.nps.gov/havo
    Gary Wuchner, Napau Fire Information Officer
    (808) 985-6174 or (209) 742-8990 (cell)
    gary_wuchner@nps.gov

  • 25 Mar 2011 /  Uncategorized

    Photo by Tiffany Edwards Hunt. All rights reserved. Use with permission only.

    Regular Big Island Chronicle readers are aware of the fact that I just had a baby boy a month ago. I have been cocooning at home with my newborn, going out to do errands once a week.  In my nest today, I was going through photographs when I came across a photo of a plate of food I had not too recently at Akmal Indian Food in Hilo. One look at the photograph and I got a mean craving to revisit the restaurant.  Readers will recall that Sam Akmal was the victim of an internet smear totally unrelated to the dining experience she offered. I urged readers to visit the restaurant, once located on Lanikaula Street and now located on Haili Street across from Lyman’s Museum.  Be prepared to pay cash, and to have some very scrumptiously, freshly-prepared Indian food from a single mother who proudly displays her young child’s artwork on the walls.  It really is a heart-warming experience to eat at Akmal’s, not just for the food but for the fact that you are supporting local business and a genuinely nice person with a sweet, artistic daughter.  Suffice it to say, Akmal’s is kid-friendly. I certainly will be making a point to visit the restaurant with my newborn, the next time I’m out and about doing errands. Find Akmal’s at 259 Haili Street. Call (808) 769-3944. The hours of operation are 11 p.m. to 8 p.m.

  • 25 Mar 2011 /  Uncategorized

    Perspectives On Health Care is a series of community conversations started by Tutu’s House to help us discover ways to improve health care for ourselves, one person at a time, one small step at a time. Through the time honored island tradition of simply “talking story,” participants will discover small solutions to improve their personal health care.

    The public is invited to join the conversation at Tutu’s House on Wednesday, March 30, 6:30 – 8:30 pm.

    Tutu’s House is located in the Kamuela Business Center. For more information, call (808) 885-6777 and visit http://www.tutushouse.org/Perspective.html

    Tutu’s House is a project of Friends of the Future, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization which facilitates community-led change, perpetuates cherished cultural anchors, and improves health-related quality of life for the Hawai`i Island community. For the Friends of the Future Annual Report and information about its programs visit the web at fofhawaii.org or call (808) 885-8336.

    (Submitted by Michelle Medeiros.)

  • 25 Mar 2011 /  Uncategorized

     

    Editor’s Note: Make-A-Wish Foundation has helped my ohana in year’s past, and I can’t emphasize enough the importance of an organization like this one. Any support whatsoever will ensure this organization’s survival and surely help improve the lives of children enduring the most tragic of health challenges. I promise you that your donation is worthwhile. No joke.

    On Friday, April 8, 2011, from 5 p.m. until midnight at The Waterfront at Aloha Tower Marketplace, the Boys Bunch will host an evening fundraiser featuring two live bands, dancing and great door prizes including neighbor island getaways courtesy of Castle Resorts & Hotels.

    Tickets to attend are $25 in advance and $30 at the door that include one free drink and heavy pupu early in the evening. A silent auction with valuable donations will also be held from 5-8 p.m. All net proceeds will be donated to Make-A-Wish Foundation of Hawaii. Ticket purchases in excess of $5 are tax-deductible.

    Make-A-Wish Hawaii’s mission is to grant the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions. Each year, 50 to 60 children from Hawaii have their wishes granted with the most popular being traveling to Disney World in Orlando to meet Mickey Mouse. Other popular wishes include going on shopping sprees, meeting a celebrity
    and trips to visit loved ones.

    “We’re truly grateful for the support of Honolulu’s Boy’s Bunch over the past 25 years and the community for the opportunity to put together a great evening of fun and entertainment,” said Lyn Brown, Executive Director, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Hawaii. Event Chairperson Bruce Liebert adds “The April Foolish Party, though only one night, helps touch the lives of children and their families forever.”

    The Annual April Foolish Party has been running consecutively since 1984, led by The Boys Bunch; an informal Honolulu social organization. During the past five years, the Annual April Foolish Party has raised more than $135,000 for Make-A-Wish Hawaii. “We are extremely proud to sponsor the April Foolish Day Party’s Silver Anniversary and make it possible for everyone to have a fun time and be foolish while helping the children of Make-A-Wish Hawaii,” said Brad Coates, Boys Bunch Chairperson.

    To purchase tickets, call Make-A-Wish Hawaii at (808) 537-3118. Read the rest of this entry »

  • 24 Mar 2011 /  environment, food, Island Events, news, politics

    BENEFIT FOR THE HILO INTER-TRIBAL POWWOW

    APRIL 2, 2011 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

    POLYNESIAN ROOM  NANILOA VOLCANO RESORT  HILO

    IBIS

    Kaliko Guyz

    Dave Seawater & Friends

    Troy De Roche with Manu Josiah

    Silent Auction

    No Host Food and Beverage

    $10 advance  $15 door

    Tickets available Kea’au Natural Foods & Connections PCS

    Information: Liz (808) 557-8607    www.hilopowow.com

     

  • 24 Mar 2011 /  environment, news, politics

    The Napau Fire is 25% contained.
    Firefighters experienced very little fire activity today, due to lighter than expected trade winds and rain.  Approximately 2,076 acres have burned.   Due to favorable weather firefighters were able to hold the southern spread of the fire and cool (cold trail) hot spots 50’ into the burn.   The Napau Fire is approximately seven miles southeast of the Kilauea Visitor Center, located on the east rift of Kilauea Volcano.  It is a lava caused wildfire resulting from the March 5, 2011, Kamoamoa Fissure Eruption.  
     
    Strategy:  The continued priority is to protect the East Rift SEA, on the north perimeter of the fire.  Two additional Kipukas, islands of vegetation, have been identified as protection priorities.  The Kealakomo and Naula SEAs are on the south side of the Chain of Craters Road.   Firefighter and visitor safety is always the number one objective.  Rough terrain, obscure holes, standing dead trees and other hazards exist.  
     
    Values to be protected: All fires pose significant threats to the ecological health of the park, which are not fire adaptive, and will be put out.  A high priority fire protection goal is the east rift Special Ecological Area (SEA), an intact lowland rain forest, which has been intensively managed to exclude invasive species and protect and restore highly valued native plant and animal communities.   The north flank has the greatest potential threat to the SEA.  Protected over decades by Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, the rain and mesic forests threatened by the spread of the Napau Fire are home to plants, birds, bugs, spiders, and bats found only in Hawai’i.  They include the endangered Hawaiian  bat (`ope`ape`a)  Hawaiian hawk,(`io) and other uniquely Hawaiian plants and animals such as Hawaiian thrush, (`oma`o),  lama and sandalwood trees, happyface spiders, carnivorous caterpillars, and Hawaiian honeycreepers (`apapane and `amakihi).  National park and USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) infrastructures, monitoring equipment, and other visitor features near the fire are also being protected.
     
    Fire Resources:  Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park firefighters are being augmented with NPS fire crews from Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, Olympic and Yosemite National Parks (NPS), the Pacific West Regional Office of NPS, National NPS Fire Office in Boise and the USDA Forest Service (Eldorado, Sequoia, Stanislaus and Los Padres National Forests in CA.); 50 firefighters, fire management staff and park resource advisors are committed.
     
    Air and Smoke:  Trade winds continued to blow with less intensity, and they were accompanied with frequent rain showers.  Smoke was not visible along the Chain of Craters Road.   There are no active lava flows in the park.  Although the flow has “stagnated”, it still has the potential to ignite surrounding vegetation.  In addition to smoke, air quality is constantly monitored in regards to sulfur dioxide emissions from volcanic activity. Fire managers will continue to coordinate fire efforts with USGS HVO scientists regarding eruption activity and air quality.  
     
    Closures:  The Chain of Craters Road is re-opened.  Drivers are urged to be diligent while driving, particularly near the hair-pin turn, as firefighters and fire engines are on the road.  
     
    Partners Involved:  US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and USDA Forest Service.
     
    Additional Information and Contacts:  
    Hawai’i Volcanoes Webpage:   http://www.nps.gov/havo
    Gary Wuchner, Napau Fire Information Officer
    (808) 985-6174 or (209) 742-8990 (cell)
    gary_wuchner@nps.gov

  • ​By Pete Hoffmann

    There are times when one wonders whether anyone listens.  Part of the problem may be a lack of communication, or perhaps a lack of understanding of perhaps a lack of leadership.  You decide which of these applies in the recent tsunami siren debacle.
     
    In December 2009, my office initiated discussions with County Civil Defense to address obvious shortfalls in tsunami siren coverage in our resort areas in West Hawaii, brought to my attention by a Puna resident.  A little research also noted that our County code had no requirements for such an early warning system.  The first “tsunami drill” of 26 Feb 2010 highlighted these deficiencies in an actual evacuation, and shortly thereafter, my office prepared a draft amendment to our code to address this issue.
     
    The proposed legislation was referred to both the Planning Commissions, where last November and December, it was met with less than an enthusiastic reception.  The Planning Director criticized the draft proposal on several counts:  this effort shouldn’t be part of the plan approval process, State and County Civil Defense should administer the program, and maybe we shouldn’t inconvenience a developer with the associated costs of installing such a system. Both Planning Commissions gave my proposal a negative recommendation and sent it back to Council for further action.
     
    Now I’ve been a Council member long enough to appreciate that there are many possibilities to address issues of this nature.  I have no difficulty if the Planning Director and the Commissions didn’t agree with my suggestions for resolving the issue, but someone please offer alternatives.  However, none were provided.  When the draft returned to the Council’s Planning Committee in January, I urged the administration to work on some viable options.  Several coastal communities were without an obvious public safety mechanism, our County code included no such requirements, and we already had one tsunami evacuation to prove that my concern was not science fiction.  My pleas fell on deaf ears.  I received ‘thunderous silence’ from the administration.  The only response noted was to suggest that the State should pay for the sirens, and that my proposal did not work with the Planning Department’s plan review process.    
     
    Personally, I really didn’t care who pays for the installation of the sirens.  The real questions remained: when will the sirens be installed and when will a requirement be established?  Surely I couldn’t be the only one who saw this issue.  Where was the administration’s initiative?  Where was effective leadership demonstrated?  And please, let’s stop the bureaucratic double-talk and concentrate on the shortfall.  
     
    In mid-February, after continuing to plead for the administration’s assistance in crafting a bill that would meet its criticisms, the Council’s Planning Committee, frustrated with the administration’s lack of action, approved my proposal sending it to full Council by a vote of 6-3.   Finally, we heard voices from the administration that the Council’s concerns would now be considered.  
     
    On 1 March, State Civil Defense went out on bid to install a number of new civil defense sirens on the Big Island not merely in tsunami evacuation zones.  These would include sirens in areas along the coast where none previously existed: among others, two at Mauna Lani, two in the Waikoloa resort area and one at Kona Village.   On 2 March, we were told that an alternative proposal would be drafted to address the deficiency in our code regarding siren requirements. This flurry of activity did precede the second ‘tsunami drill’ on March 11, and generated a renewed urgency regarding this topic. The new administration proposal has already been placed on both Planning Commission agendas in April and May, and it can be anticipated that the long-sought alternative will be brought to Council sometime in early June.  
     
    The route taken in the effort has been torturous. Would that all tsunamis react with the same ‘glacial speed’ as this legislative process, but at least it is moving forward.  We pride ourselves, with good reason, on the effectiveness of the County’s response to both of the tsunami evacuations and how all assisted.  However, the fact remains that we had thirteen hours and five and a half hours warning respectively.  Would we have been so fortunate if we only had one or two hours notice??  While this issue is finally being addressed and sirens will eventually be installed, after some 15 months of discussion the situation today is: there are significant shortfalls in siren coverage in our resort areas, and no requirement has yet been established for new developments in our code.  Let’s hope for better leadership and let’s pray we don’t have a “third tsunami drill” in which our reaction time would be dramatically reduced as it was in Japan.
     
    (​Pete Hoffmann is a Hawaii County Councilman who represents Kohala.)

  • 24 Mar 2011 /  news

    Big Island police have located two of the three men being sought in connection with a Puna assault and burglary investigation.

    Twenty-five-year-old Johnny Leialoha of Kea’au and 22-year-old Jobe Leialoha of Nanawale turned themselves in at the South Hilo police station and were arrested at 11:20 a.m. Wednesday. Both men were released at 4 p.m. pending further investigation.

    Police are still looking for their father, 46-year-old Joe Leialoha of Hawaiian Beaches.

    Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts call Detective John Rodrigues at 966-5385 or the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

    Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.
    (Submitted by Hawaii Police Department via Nixle.)

  • 24 Mar 2011 /  news

    (Media release) — Big Island police arrested a 41-year-old Puna man Tuesday (March 22) on suspicion of burglaries and thefts.

    On Wednesday (March 24), detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section charged Jesse Iolani Auhana Akina of Kea’au with one count of first-degree theft, two counts of second-degree theft, two counts of first-degree burglary, and ownership/possession of firearms prohibited. His bail was set at $105,000.

    The charges stemmed from a residential burglary in which Akina was caught on video surveillance while he broke into a home in the Hawaiian Paradise Park subdivision and stole several items, including a firearm, with a combined value exceeding $3,000.

    Akina was scheduled to make his initial court appearance in South Hilo District Court on Thursday.
    (Submitted by Hawaii Police Department.)

  • 23 Mar 2011 /  business, commentary, letters, news, politics

    Hawaii’s broadband speeds are absolutely pathetic. The top residential
    DSL and cable modem speeds are 11Mbps and 15Mbps through Hawaiian Telcom
    and Oceanic Time Warner Cable. This pales in comparison to the speeds
    available on the mainland.

    Hawaii’s broadband duopoly is the root cause for this issue. Oceanic
    Time Warner Cable has no incentive to offer mainland type speeds because
    of Hawaiian Telcom’s ongoing woes. For example, Oceanic recently
    suspended offering their Road Runner  Turbo Plus tier (20Mbps/2Mbps) and
    upgraded the Road Runner Turbo tier to 15Mbps/1Mbps This change put
    Oceanic’s service offerings more in line with Hawaiian Telcom’s.

    This duopoly also has affected broadband availability and speeds
    particularly on the neighbor islands. The Ka’u, Puna and Hamakua areas
    on the Big Island are prime examples of this problem. In addition,
    Oceanic delayed neighbor island Road Runner speed increases until late 2011.

    Enticing more companies to overbuild Oceanic and Hawaiian Telcom
    networks is the solution to this problem. This could be done by offering
    tax breaks and creating a state level universal service fund.

    The Internet is increasingly becoming an important facet of our economy.
    However, Hawaii will be left behind unless changes are made.
    Aaron Stene
    Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

    http://thekonablog.wordpress.com/

    Twitter @konablog
    ***************************

  • 23 Mar 2011 /  environment, news, politics

    The fire remained active today due to strong gusty trade winds.   Moderate to low rates of fire spread were observed by firefighters. Flames were visible along the south flank and Chain of Craters Road and the road remains closed to visitors.  Helicopter bucket drops were utilized to cool hotspots and slow the fire’s forward progress.  All incoming fire crews were able to engage on each flank of the fire with success.  Approximately 2,010 acres have burned with no containment.   The Napau Fire is approximately seven miles southeast of the Kilauea Visitor Center, located on the east rift of Kilauea Volcano.  It is a lava caused wildfire resulting from the March 5, 2011, Kamoamoa Fissure Eruption.  
     
    Strategy:  To sum up Robin Wills, the Napau Fire Incident Commander, “today was the first day we were able to work successfully with the planning strategy, and with all the firefighting parts and pieces.  I am pleased with the work accomplished today.”  “There remains a lot of work to do, and weather will play a large part in our success” says Joe Molhoek, the park Fire Management Officer. Firefighter and visitor safety is always the number one objective.  Rough terrain, obscure holes, standing dead trees and other hazards exist.  
     
    Values to be protected: All fires pose significant threats to the ecological health of the park, which are not fire adaptive, and will be put out.  A high priority fire protection goal is the east rift Special Ecological Area (SEA), an intact lowland rain forest, which has been intensively managed to exclude invasive species and protect and restore highly valued native plant and animal communities.   The north flank has the greatest potential threat to the SEA.  Protected over decades by Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, the rain and mesic forests threatened by the spread of the Napau Fire are home to plants, birds, bugs, spiders, and bats found only in Hawai’i.  They include the endangered Hawaiian  bat (`ope`ape`a)  Hawaiian hawk,(`io) and other uniquely Hawaiian plants and animals such as Hawaiian thrush, (`oma`o),  lama and sandalwood trees, happyface spiders, carnivorous caterpillars, and Hawaiian honeycreepers (`apapane and `amakihi).  National park and USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) infrastructures, monitoring equipment, and other visitor features near the fire are also being protected.
     
    Fire Resources:  Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park firefighters are being augmented with NPS fire crews from Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, Olympic and Yosemite National Parks (NPS), the Pacific West Regional Office of NPS, National NPS Fire Office in Boise and the USDA Forest Service (Eldorado, Sequoia, Stanislaus and Los Padres National Forests in CA.); 43 firefighters and management staff are committed.
     
    Air and Smoke:  Strong trade winds continued to blow today with periodic rain showers.  Smoke is visible along the Chain of Craters Road.   In addition to smoke, air quality is constantly monitored in regards to sulfur dioxide emissions from volcanic activity. Fire managers will continue to coordinate fire efforts with USGS HVO scientists regarding eruption activity and air quality.  
     
    Closures:  The Chain of Craters Road is closed approximately 6 miles from the visitor center at Mau Loa o Mauna Ulu due to smoke over the road and  visibility issue for drivers.
     
    Partners Involved:  US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and USDA Forest Service.
     
    Additional Information and Contacts:  
    Hawai’i Volcanoes Webpage:   http://www.nps.gov/havo
    Gary Wuchner, Napau Fire Information Officer
    (808) 985-6174 or (209) 742-8990 (cell)
    gary_wuchner@nps.gov

  • 23 Mar 2011 /  business, food, Island Art, Island Events, news

    Lee Ann Gurney (Jazz Mele), Hal Glatzer (Le Hot Club de Hilo) and mandolinist/bluesman Richard Schutte will present “Twilight Time” at Boston Basil’s Topside on Alii Drive Sunday.
    The vintage jazz and swing hits will be played from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

  • (Media release) — Hawaiian cultural experts Peter Apo, Margo Harumi Mau Bunnell, Kumu Keala Ching, and Donna Wheeler, will present valuable insights into Hawaiian culture for hospitality industry managers and employees at the NaHHA Ola Hawai’i workshops April 6-7.
     
    The speakers will share knowledge on a range of topics including “Understanding Hawaiian Values” and “Where to Find Real Hawaiian Culture.”
     
    • Peter Apo is a songwriter-musician, President of Mamo Records and a Trustee of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. He was a founding member of NaHHA and was Special Assistant on Hawaiian Affairs to former Governor Ben Cayetano.
     
    • Margo Mau Bunnell is the Sales and Operations Manager for Queens MarketPlace at Waikoloa Beach Resort and CEO of the Moku O Keawe Foundation.
     
    • Kumu Keala Ching is a Hawaiian cultural educator, composer and spiritual advisor to Hawaiian organizations. He is fluent in the Hawaiian language and is Kumu Hula for Ka Pa Hula Na Wai Iwi Ola.
     
    • Donna Wheeler has over thirty years of experience in the Hawaii hotel industry having served in operations, sales and marketing capacities, representing over 60 hotels and resorts on the Hawaiian islands of O’ahu, Maui, Kaua’i, Hawai’i Island and Moloka’i; as well as New Zealand, Guam, Saipan, and Thailand.
     
    The two-day learning experience will explore the value of hosting, managing visitor information and sales and marketing strategies with a special focus on Hawaiian traditions and culture.
     
    Also speaking at the workshop will be:
     
    Veronica Puanani Claveran
    Director of Rooms, Keauhou Beach Resort
     
    Owana Wilcox-Likiaksa
    Human Resources Coordinator, Hilton Waikoloa Village
      
    Joann Nanea Perreira-Machiguchi
    Catering Sales Manager, Hawai`i Prince Hotel
     
    April Ke`ala Kadooka
    Learning Manager, Four Seasons Hualalai
     
    The Ola Hawai’i workshop will be held on April 6-7 from 9am – 5pm at the Keauhou Beach Resort, Keauhou, Hawai’i Island.
     
    Enrollment is limited and participants need to register by March 28. The cost, which includes lunch on both days, is $60. 
     
    For more information, visit nahha.com
     
    For registration or questions, contact Pamela Davis-Lee at 808-628-6375 or pam@nahha.com
     
    The Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) is dedicated to the promotion and perpetuation of Hawaiian culture and traditions. Its mission is to promote Hawaiian culture, values and traditions in the workplace through consultation and education, and to provide opportunities for the Native Hawaiian community to shape the future of tourism.
    (Submitted by Matt Robertson.)

  • 23 Mar 2011 /  news

    Big Island police arrested a 33-year-old Puna woman Tuesday (March 22) and charged her with assaulting a police officer and other offenses.

    Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section charged Natasha Robina Nihipali of Mountain View with first-degree assault against a law enforcement officer, first-degree terroristic threatening, resisting arrest and two traffic violations. Her bail was set at $5,500.

    The charges stemmed from an incident in which Nihipali called police to report an intoxicated man walking in the middle of the road in Hawaiian Paradise Park. Upon arrival, responding officers contacted Nihipali, who appeared intoxicated and confronted the officers.

    She allegedly grabbed the hair of a 35-year-old female officer. The five-year veteran officer with the Police Department was injured when Nihipali pulled so hard during the assault that hair was removed from the officer’s scalp. The officer was treated by a physician for her injuries.

    Nihipali is being held at the Hilo police cellblock pending her initial court appearance in south Hilo District Court, which was scheduled for today, Wednesday afternoon (March 23).
    (Submitted by Hawaii Police Department.)

  • ‘How to Live Off the Grid for 30 Days’ 

    In the event of major solar flare, tsunami, earthquake, volcanic eruption

    or other triggered event how will you and your family survive … for a

    modest amount?

    Learn more  April  2, 9am to 5pm with best selling author, herbalist,

    small farm specialist and physicist Dr.Richard Alan Miller along with

    Marie Zancanaro, self-sufficiency expert, nutritional counselor and

    value added production consultant. Both are survival specialists with a

    wealth of survival skills to help you and your loved ones be prepared for

    any possible emergency. 

    Learn: What you need to keep in stock and prepare for any

    emergency. Topics include: water, food, medicine, sanitation, heat,

    fuel, diversion, entertainment, and a ‘go bag’.

    Cost: $25/person40/couple. Scholarships available along with

    kupuna/student/woofer rates.

     To register and for more information contact: Star Newland, 896 8658. 

    planetpuna@yahoo.com. www.planetpuna.com and

    www.nwbotanicals.org. 

    Location: Wentworth Building Room 1.  University of Hawai’i-Hilo, by bookstore.

    Sponsored by Global Hope