Letters — TMT Versus Aloha

Violence demands courage. And it can bring change–but rarely in the heart. And it can bring anger, suffering, and a backlash of more violence.

Non-violence demands more courage. But it can change hearts, and disarm evil.

And then (as I understand it) there is aloha. Aloha takes the most courage, calling us to remain connected to the seen and the unseen, despite all that seeks to frighten and confuse. Aloha disarms evil, and creates change, on the deepest level–not just for what we face today, but for all we face tomorrow.

To all on Mauna Kea who showed the world how to stand in aloha—imua!

*Thirty Meter Telescope


Cory (Martha) Harden

48 replies
  1. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    Aloha Cory my friend.
    Mayor Billy Kenoi was a true leader that day. I was in the second van and heard something about the zip ties coming out. then I saw the mayor walking to the front. He must have been alarmed by that too! I then got out of the van and went to the front. The opposition had the road blocked. I heard the mayor asking if there was a way to make this work? It seemed to me that a deal was close. Lanakila started to protest about lawsuits not being settled and the Mayor said, that was for the courts to decide. Today was not about that. But, Lanakila and Kaliko turned the mayor down. There could be no compromise. The Mayor asked me and Herring Kalua what we thought. I said, I thought that we should go back down to Hale Pohaku and do a ceremony there if have to. No sense risk anyone getting hurt. He agreed. From the start it was clear that the mayor was primarily concerned for the safety of his people. Like a true leader, he stepped up when he needed to step up and he made the decision for the right reasons–the safety of his people. I jumped back in the van and they started to turn around. By then others started to walk up to get to the site. I stayed in the van and went back down to Hale Pohaku. As I look back, I am happy we have a true leader in Mayor Billy. He stepped up when a leader was needed, he made the right decision for the right reason. People may have had different view points, but everyone felt safe. I agree with Cory. That is aloha!!

  2. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    I also thought that the treatment of the foreign dignitaries was inappropriate and shameful.

    It is like high school graduation. The work is done already and the family and friends come to the graduation ceremony.

    What happened to the foreign dignitaries made me feel shame. If was as if someone came to the graduation ceremony and grabbed the mic and gave all the guests good scolding.

    Somebody should have pulled some of those folks ears when they were small kid.

    If people want to represent us Hawaiians, they gotta know the difference.

  3. joy cash
    joy cash says:

    Violence, physical or emotional/verbal wells up from a reservior of fear turned into anger. Primal emotions, yes. We all have them.
    How we choose to express them becomes the tipping point in civil society.

    When civil society reaches a breaking point, when common people lose hope of having their basic needs met (not wants, by the way), then we can expect to see a turn towards both emotional & physical violence.

    While I never condone violence, I understand we are all capable of perpetrating violence. Owning our own fears/angers goes a long way in defusing our potential violence. Pointing fingers just ignites fears/angers.

    Better that we sit down in community to come to a compromised position we can all live with. This applies to all our shared issues we face living on our island home. We are all adults, time to act as such.

  4. The Casual Observer
    The Casual Observer says:

    Richard,
    What happened with the protesters is not something that fell out of the clear blue skies. You of all people should have known the magnitude of the issue and the emotions it would invoke amongst these dissenting folks. If anything, the planners should have known better than to take the foreign dignitaries up to the site, knowing the volatility of the situation. The protesters did what they were always going to do — protest. Maybe you all should have done a “virtual” groundbreaking somewhere else. To me, the only guys with egg on their face are the folks who arranged for this groundbreaking to happen the way it did. Shame on the planners to be so dismissive of all possible things that could have taken place. And truth be told, the planners were in a lose/lose situation. If the protesters did in fact get arrested, the images and stories floated via social media and mainstream media would have been worse. The image of Hawaiians being led away in handcuffs? Not god. So yesterday was bound to go the way it did. You guys should have known better as to go ahead with the groundbreaking — with the foreign dignitaries — knowing what was going to go down. Casting the “shame” as a fault of the protesters is a bit misguided in this particular situation.

  5. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    Aloha observer. I was not on the planning team. I was along for the ride. But, when there was a possibility that folks could get zip tied. I went outside. That was not going to happen if I had anything to do with it. I still think that what Kaliko and Lanakila did was make ass for Hawaiians. If anything the sympathy vote was with the TMT dignitaries and Kahu Akaka who was very magnanimous.

    There was no access restriction for the protesters. Ironically, it was the protesters who blocked the access. Kaliko Kanaele, the representative of the Royal Order of Kamehameha 1, asked if the caravan had permits from the Hawaiian Kingdom. They did not have a permit from the Hawaiian Kingdom so they could not go any further. What? The Mayor went to the front and tried his best to cut a deal where everyone could go participate in the cutting of the maile lei and digging the o’o. But, Lanakila and Kaliko would not agree. The Mayor asked me and Herring Kalua what we thought. There were only two alternatives either arrest the people and pass through or we go back. We thought that we should turn around and go back. No sense get anyone hurt. As a banana farmer. I always tell my workers not to confront banana bunch rippers. Both, them and our workers have cane knives. The last thing needed was a cane knife fight. The mayor looked at the protester folks as his people too. He was not going to arrest them or let anyone get hurt. He was a true leader. He made the right call for the right reasons. I was very proud of him!!
    As for the protesters, I felt very ashamed that our own Hawaiian people treated our guests and Kahu Akaka with so much disrespect. They first blocked vehicle access then when folks walked up they were called slithering snakes disrupting and disrespecting Kahu Akaka in the process. The sites four corners were blessed earlier in the day. So cutting the maile lei and digging the ground with o’o was ceremonial. That part was like a high school graduation. The hard work studying had already been done and it was time to gather with family and friends. But, someone bursts in, grabs the mic and starts to scold the guests and relatives. That was the part that made me feel shame. It was not aloha no matter how much you spin it.

  6. Errol
    Errol says:

    Well said Casual Observer, Thank You. It was expected that the protest would have happen. And it did! @Richard Ha..your quote “Somebody should have pulled some of those folks ears when they were small kid.” Maybe we should take lessons from our younger generation. They did not represent you but spoke for Hawaiian culture and beliefs. There is no compromise…its either one way or the other. Aloha….

    PS
    Mauna Kea and the people who want to save her

  7. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    I wasn’t asked to participate in the planning or execution of the ground breaking. When I heard that the zip ties may be coming out, that alarmed me. I think that alarmed the mayor too. I wrote this on my facebook page 2 days ago. Frankly, I thought it was “make ass”.

    ….There was no access restriction for the protesters. Ironically, it was the protesters who blocked the access. Kaliko Kanaele, the representative of the Royal Order of Kamehameha 1, asked if the caravan had permits from the Hawaiian Kingdom. They did not have a permit from the Hawaiian Kingdom so they could not go any further. What? The Mayor went to the front and tried his best to cut a deal where everyone could go participate in the cutting of the maile lei and digging the o’o. But, Lanakila and Kaliko would not agree. The Mayor asked me and Herring Kalua what we thought. There were only two alternatives either arrest the people and pass through or we go back. We thought that we should turn around and go back. No sense get anyone hurt. As a banana farmer. I always tell my workers not to confront banana bunch rippers. Both, them and our workers have cane knives. The last thing needed was a cane knife fight. The mayor looked at the protester folks as his people too. He was not going to arrest them or let anyone get hurt. He was a true leader. He made the right call for the right reasons. I was very proud of him!!
    As for the protesters, I felt very ashamed that our own Hawaiian people treated our guests and Kahu Akaka with so much disrespect. They first blocked vehicle access then when folks walked up they were called slithering snakes disrupting and disrespecting Kahu Akaka in the process. The sites four corners were blessed earlier in the day. So cutting the maile lei and digging the ground with o’o was ceremonial. That part was like a high school graduation. The hard work studying had already been done and it was time to gather with family and friends. But, someone bursts in, grabs the mic and starts to scold the guests and relatives. That was the part that made me feel shame. It was not aloha no matter how much you spin it.

  8. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    Errol:
    I’m sorry. It was inappropriate to call the people thieves and slithering snakes. It was just bad manners. Protesting was fine. I had no problems with that.

  9. NeighborWatch
    NeighborWatch says:

    man high school graduation sure seems like a big deal to you Ha. You did go further right? I imagine these were adults not prom king and queens. So the correlation is lost on me. There is no compromise when two entities want to be king of the hill, can only be one. either/or

  10. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    Errol.
    ..maybe we should take lessons from the younger generation?
    First, someone has to be the adult in the room. Whoever is mentoring Lanakila. Do not put him in that position again. Also, advise him that –“you no can be king if you no can feed the people”. I think he has great potential. Royal Order of Kamehhameha 1. You have to sort out your mission and identity. As evidenced by the Law of the Splintered Paddle, Kamehameha the Great took care of his rubbah slippah folks. You guys seem to have lost your way.

  11. Anakala
    Anakala says:

    Richard Ha:

    You can spin things however youd like, as that is your freedom and choice. To me and many others, your constant shmoozing and advocacy for all things development and big-business in the islands makes it obvious your depth as a Kanaka Maoli is as being the “token Hawaiian” – which im sure comes with a nice fee.

    However, there is no place for the lies you repeat. “There was no access restriction for the protesters” – reviewing the video and first-hand accounts of all those involved in the event, it is clear-cut that the access road was blocked by the sheriffs, DLNR and rangers first, and things snowballed from there.

    You should definitely feel shame, Mr. Ha. It is not the truth no matter how much you use the word “aloha”.

  12. Errol
    Errol says:

    @Ha… I think Lanakila is more of an adult and man than you are. Of course that’s just my opinion and many others who commented under the videos regarding the protest on Mauna Kea. He stood up and you went back down in your van…..how man is that? Maybe you should have stayed and listen? Or are you just plain deaf ears to any of it. As for reverend Akaka, why don’t you ask him of his thoughts and mana’o and not just assume things. Quote “You guys seem to lost your way.” LOL…and what way is that? I belong to no group but sure understand what they are doing. Funny how money talks….moves mountains. Is that what its all about for you? I have no idea? You tell me. I’ve walked the Humuula trail, Lake Waiau and hiked all around mountains of Mauna Kea. I enjoy the beauty of it, the quietness and the little things you probably wont see in your life time. First it was 8…then 13…..and now more telescopes. It was mentioned 57 before but was shut down. At early times, the county mayor,
    “Herbert Matayoshi”
    strongly opposed construction of more telescopes on Mauna Kea for aesthetic reasons, of referring to them as pimples on the face of a beautiful mountain. Don’t let our mountain turn into Warts….. There is enough damage to a mountain that can never be repaired back to normalcy… As for your knowledge about Kamehameha I? How much do you know about his history, his down line and his government since you mentioned his name. Did he feed the people or did he conquer the people? His uncle taught him many things to be an Ali’i…and navigation was one of it. How can you conquer an island if you didn’t know navigation or the stars (no instruments). Hokulea doesn’t use any electronics in their navigation…..just stars. What makes you assume that Lanakila was trying to be King? Lanakila doesn’t walk alone, he has many others walking in the same foot prints as many of our Kupuna did.. Maybe you should step back a little and first find your foot prints or have you forgotten where your roots are? As for all who participate, it wasn’t just Hawaiians but includes many other mix-culture groups. Some of them were botanist who was part of the University of Hawaii…..some of them teach agriculture. But in a way, they all have a common goal… Preserve Mauna Kea…. Do you research!

    @konagold…..you are right. You can not put a price of what is sacred….it is much more…. Thank You, that was very good of you…. Smile Aloha

  13. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    http://www.bigislandvideonews.com/2014/10/09/video-full-coverage-thirty-meter-telescope-road-block/.

    Anakala
    I have never received any compensation for advocating for the TMT. Take a look at this long version. The Mayor wanted everyone to go up together and he was turned down. The Office of Maunakea Management had safety procedures to insure. There was a one lane raod and they needed to make sure an ambulance could come down. Otherwise everybody coould go up. The net result of the exercise was that the sympathy vote went to the TMT.

  14. Kelly
    Kelly says:

    @konagold,
    The whole earth is sacred.
    It is also being bought, sold, and ravaged through the workings of the imposed economic system.
    A price tag has been put on most everything.
    Don’t hold a liberation movement to a “special” standard.
    A trillion dollars is a token amount compared to damages the colonizing forces have done to Hawaii.

  15. Roy Dean
    Roy Dean says:

    I applaud and wholeheartedly support Kaliko and all
    protestors in their efforts to save Mauna kea and other
    sacred sites in the state. I know Kaliko to be an
    honorable man.

    The mayor was wise to avoid an embarrassing incident
    opening the doors for a lawsuit.

  16. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    The law of the splintered paddle basically says; “you no can be ali’i if you no can feed the people”. I don’t see any effort to take care of the people.

  17. tia
    tia says:

    Richard Ha, the “do gooder” who wants to frack the land and poison it with GMO’s anc chemicals, now berates people for having the cahones he doesn’t have to stand up to bureaurats. The pay must be really good for Richard to continually condone the desecration of the land.

    It’s not your graduation party, Richard. No one invited you to crash the party when its host did not invite you and your “dignitaries” to come eat all the food and crap in their house. Shame!

  18. Errol
    Errol says:

    @ Ha… LOL…You best research “The law of the splintered paddle” . Also check out “Other Versions” . In short words, it’s “Basically of Human Rights in the Hawaiian Culture during Kamehameha’s time……and even in todays laws. Not sure where you got “you no can be ali’i if you no can feed the people.” or “you no can be King if you no can feed the people.” Here is a video on it by “Laulani Teale” . You have a crop up statement! Your comment “I think he has great potential, Royal Order of Kamehameha I.” Seems like you are taking stabs at him and “The Royal Order?” My question was “What makes you assume that Lanakila was trying to be King?” Now you’re adding “Ali’i”. All he was doing is fighting for Mauna Kea….Preserving Mauna Kea…. Protecting Mauna Kea…. Is that so wrong? If I was you, I’d put a zip on your mouth especially when your colleagues are of importance. You are just making them look bad in this post! You are attracting attention and at the same time, making an ASS out yourself! Aloha

  19. Kelly
    Kelly says:

    The prolonged unlawful occupation of Hawaii.
    It’s enough to fragment and overthrow the sustainable systems once successfully feeding those here.
    Maybe it’s incongruous to apply ‘splintered paddle’ concept when the canoe itself stays splintered.
    What agency to feed, freely, does any indigenous leader have when the original communities are occupied, with all that implies.
    (By the way, industrial monocropping and all its required chemicals on crops like papaya for export, and monoculture banana, is no way ‘to feed the people’.
    Think ‘bunchy top’ virus.
    And hormone mimickers [pesticides,etc] on our vegetables).
    Apologies for the tangent on ‘feeding the people’.

  20. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    Humans is a monocrop. But, the Ebola virus is very serious. And, we are now searching for biotech solutions. Kalo lo’i style is a monocrop. Dr Susan Miyasaka, told me that it is vulnerable to a disease much like bananas are. The Mai’a Maoli and Popoulu were wiped out by the Fusarium wilt. There is a reason that 90% of the folks who farm for a living is in favor of bio tech solutions. They actually farm and they know. It is a continuous battle with weeds, insects and diseases. It is taking more energy to get energy as time goes on. It is the difference between the Energy Returned on the Energy Invested (EROI), that is available for society to use. That is getting less and less. In the 1930’s, the energy in one barrel of oil could get you a hundred barrels, in the 1970’s that had become 30-1, going after new oil now is around 10-1. Tar sands are around 6-1 and biofuels are around 3-1 and less. We need around 12-1 to send people to grad school. Geothermal is around 15-1. I was the only person from Hawaii to attend five Association for the Study of Peak Oil (ASPO) conferences. We are much too dependent on the military and tourism. I don’t get paid in any way from the TMT, Geothermal and the seed companies. I obtained the knowledge and it became my kuleana. I am concerned about the rubbah slippah folks and future generations. the Law of the Splintered Paddle has direct application. I’m the messenger. I have no aspiration to be an ali’i. I am a rubbah slippah person. I go see the Governor and testify at the Legislature in shorts.

  21. Errol
    Errol says:

    @Ha… You interpretation of “The Law of the Splintered Paddle” is far from it…somebody must have read you a fairy tale story. I doubt if you care about future generations…. Its all about you! Its all about you! Ho-oio oia… Aloha

  22. konagold
    konagold says:

    Aloha Kelly

    you write : “The whole earth is sacred.
    It is also being bought, sold, and ravaged through the workings of the imposed economic system.
    A price tag has been put on most everything.
    Don’t hold a liberation movement to a “special” standard.”

    this is the standard for all

    two wrongs do not make a right nor does such sophistry make for a civil right

    when money is demanded for ones ox being gored it is the lust for money that speaks louder than the lust for righteousness which lowers the credibility and CHEAPENS the cause

  23. Anakala
    Anakala says:

    Still trying to spin the roadblock, huh, Mr. Ha? Shame on you.

    And your interpretation of the Kanawai Mamalahoe is off-base. But are you trying to imply you should be Ali?i?

    Besides, the TMT doesnt “feed the people.” What do the rubbah slippah folks have to do with those who protested the TMT?!? You sound like a broken record, and though you may not get any $ from the directly from the TMT project, they still use you as the Token Hawaiian, no? Maybe you was just there supporting your buddy Wally and the rest of the old boy cronies you back. No need lie.

    no one involved with the protest seriously wanted money as compensation for anything @Konagold, are you that dense?

  24. Errol
    Errol says:

    @Ha… Apparently my post on Oct 14th had been deleted or edited out. It had the same link that you have provided for me here. And I also had another version by Pukui (see below) which amounts to the same thing. It is the story of Kamehameha going after two fishermen, where Kamehameha’s foot got caught in the lava rocks and in a bad situation. The fisherman struck him with a paddle but did not kill him because he said life was sacred. In respect from that time, he said every man has a right to defend himself whether its against the Ali’i himself and others who may abuse their power. Today in our Constitution of the State of Hawaii, the Law of the Splintered Paddle Article IX Section 10

    PUBLIC SAFETY

    Section 10. The law of the splintered paddle, mamala-hoe kanawai, decreed by Kamehameha I–Let every elderly person, woman and child lie by the roadside in safety–shall be a unique and living symbol of the State’s concern for public safety.

    The State shall have the power to provide for the safety of the people from crimes against persons and property. [Add Const Con 1978 and election Nov 7, 1978]

    Pukui’s version… http://www.talkingstory.org/2007/06/kamehameha-law-legend-and-leadership/

    Youtube: http://youtu.be/W5Ma0nyEuYs

    Ha… Its no point of me explaining or going any further if my post wont go….or is deleted. I hope you really see things different in life and defend the Hawaiian beliefs and culture. “Progress” is not always the truth, sometimes it is a deceptive tumble backwards, sometimes off the abyss. Aloha

  25. Errol
    Errol says:

    @Ha…Not sure why, but I see my post again. If you click on October 14th, 2014 at 9:35 pm post, you will see the same link you had provided

  26. Errol
    Errol says:

    @Ha… Hawaii State Constitution
    Article IX Section 10
    http://lrbhawaii.org/con/conart9.html

    PUBLIC SAFETY

    Section 10. The law of the splintered paddle, mamala-hoe kanawai, decreed by Kamehameha I–Let every elderly person, woman and child lie by the roadside in safety–shall be a unique and living symbol of the State’s concern for public safety.

    The State shall have the power to provide for the safety of the people from crimes against persons and property. [Add Const Con 1978 and election Nov 7, 1978]

  27. Errol
    Errol says:

    Thanks Alan… I did clean my chache and some other tempory files/cookies…maybe that cause my Oct 14 post to disappear from my computer? Its back anyways…thanks. Aloha

  28. Errol
    Errol says:

    @konagold… Your comment “I watched the following vid and the protest lost some credibility when a trillion dollars was demanded as recompense because one can not put a price tag on that which is sacred

    how is that somehow pono??”

    It was just a figure of speech… I understood and a zillion others did (another figure of speech). Hope I made it easier for you 🙂 Another smile face….

    As for Kelly’s statement “The prolonged unlawful occupation of Hawaii.” President Clinton sign the Apology resolution http://www.hawaii-nation.org/publawsum.html I’m not sure of your statement “two wrongs do not make a right”? The Hawaiian Kingdom was over thrown….land was stolen. In the protest video on Mauna Kea, there was one Haole guy holding a sign..”Show me the Title” I’d like to see that title too? He stands along side the protesters. How can the protesters or Hawaiians be wrong? Their land…their mountain was stolen! Like I have mentioned before, I Do Not Belong to Any Group! I stand alone and do not want to see more pimples/warts on Mauna Kea. If they keep on adding more….it will look very ugly… Its like mold on bread…you don’t want to eat it? Figure of Speech again… Anyways, either you’re for it or against it….The additional Observatory that is….no compromise. And I doubt it will stop there…..

  29. Kelly
    Kelly says:

    @Errol, can’t tell if you are agreeing with me,
    or are misquoting me.
    Thanks for the Clinton apology link, very powerful.
    Sets up the question;
    “Does the Hawaiian Kingdom exist?”
    If so, then those identifying with the occupying empire (USA) are participating in the unlawful prolonged occupation of the Hawaiian Kingdom.

  30. Errol
    Errol says:

    @Kelly… Sorry… I was agreeing with you. I was trying to back you up. My statement ( I’m not sure of your statement “two wrongs do not make a right”?) was directed towards konagold. As for your question “Does the Hawaiian Kingdom exist?” Maybe these links can help answer that question.. The second link is easier to understand (for me that is)… Aloha

    http://hawaiiankingdom.org/blog/why-the-hawaiian-kingdom-as-an-independent-state-continues-to-exist/

    http://hawaiiankingdom.org/blog/hawaii-news-now-dr-keanu-sai-discusses-existence-of-hawaiian-kingdom/

  31. Errol
    Errol says:

    @Kelly… Long and lengthy but Dr, Keanu Sai discusses the history of the 1893 Executive Agreements between the Kingdom of Hawaii and the United States of America, and the profound impacts today.

  32. tia
    tia says:

    Richard Ha can probably tell you that the Kingdom doesn’t exist since he profits greatly from U.S. Inc. and he knows all. 90% of farmers want biotech???? Really??? HaHaHa! Nobody asked me nor my ohana, spanning all the islands, organically farming.

  33. Kelly
    Kelly says:

    Papaya and flower/foliage growers don’t count as farmers;
    they are chemical technicians.
    They don’t enhance soil health and they pollute the air and water. But according to Ha they qualify as farmers because they make money.
    According to world food experts (like Vandana Shiva)
    70% of local food production is accomplished by subsistence farmers.
    Who wants local food production to be controlled by giant multinational chemical corporations?
    Farmers?
    Really?
    But back to the TMT and the Hawaiian Kingdom…

  34. Errol
    Errol says:

    Man worse enemy is himself. There are already to many negatives on “Genetically Modified Foods” . Chemicals does more harm than good in the long run. Last year, I ran across this Haole guy weeding the garden at the Kanaka Garden in Hilo, near Kamehameha Statue. I was curious of the taro they had in their garden. He gave me some and said I don’t think they would mind if you had some. Then he said “How would you like to have a garden and go away on vacation for 3 to 6 months and come back with your garden ready and matured. He gave me his card and website “Professional Agroforestry Consultants” , a garden without chemicals or fossil fuel, fertilizers, factory farm by products, irrigation as they would have a grave effect on the wildlife habitat and the people around the world. He mentioned on his website to look at a person name “Masanobu Fukuoka” . An incredible man known around the world. Food without chemicals and without GMO food. Maybe Ha should take lessons from Masanobu Fukuoka on farming or consider attending to one of the lectures by the Professional Agroforestry Consultants that they have at the University of Hawaii Agriculture Building. By the way, take note of the guy holding the sign on Mauna Kea Protest “Show me the Title!” As for the “Kingdom of Hawaii” , they have all the proof they need. Aloha

  35. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    Aloha Errol;
    You bring up some good points. Re; Masanobu Fukuka’s methods and one of its derivatives Korean Natural Farming. Master Cho visited my farm. I was very impressed by his daughters ability to accurately diagnose a plant problem. I am helping a farmer set up a farm using this technique right now. I just need to see if the pluses exceed the minuses. I would love for the farmer to succeed. WE all know we need to free ourselves from imported petroleum based products. Kale Gumapac is a good friend of mine. I know a lot about Dr Sai’s findings. I don’t disagree with any of his findings. My concern lies in understanding how this all plays out. What will happen to the rubbah slippah folks? Will people lose their land? What kind of government? Can we vote? How are we going to feed the people? Farming takes hard work and dedication. Insects, weeds diseases all want to survive as much as we humans do. It will take all of us doing all kinds of agriculture to feed all of us. Flower growing feeds our soul. We need that too. The farmers I refer to make their living from farming. They feed their families, pay their bills and send their kids to school. They are not the enemy. As for me, I’ve done pretty much what I set out to do. I have no aspirations other than to share my experience and knowledge with younger generation folks. I’ve farmed for 35 years where the pluses needed to exceed the minuses or we would have had to go do something else. We have grown more than 100 million pounds of food along the way. I know a little about food production. The most important thing we must maintain as we make our way into the uncertain future is the spirit of aloha. We need to respect and take care of each other, or the insects, pests and diseases will eat our lunch.

  36. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    Except for Rainbow papayas, the farmers who do farming for a living do not grow GMO crops. I don’t grow GMO crops. But, myself and 90% of the farmers who make a living farming, know that GMO crops are safe. We are not pro or anti GMO. We are pro science.

  37. Errol
    Errol says:

    I see Master Cho had visited your farm as well as others in Kapoho. I first heard of him about a year ago thru a good friend of mines doing taro farming. Other farmers are using his method of Indigenous Microorganisms “IMO” with great success. I hope your helping that farmer using Master Cho’s Natural Farming Techniques succeed and again influence others to follow instead of using chemical, herbicides and GMO products. There are places on this earth that was full of vegetation and life only to turn into a barren desert because of improper care by man. Its to bad Masanobu Fukuoka had passed away but he already set the pendulum in motion, others into motion. Master Cho is doing his part. He is helping the world in the right way. I agree with NeighborWatch….What good is a 100 million pounds of GMO junk when people wont eat it. I’m talking in general. Keep on changing your ingredients to where something people will eat healthy….you wont go wrong. A short video of “Korean Natural Farming” for anyone….

    I’m assuming the “Rubbah Slippah” folks are the maka??inana? The commoners? people? citizens? Please correct me if I’m wrong. What would happen if someone stole all your farm equipment and possession? and you found it in a Pawn Shop? Do you buy it back, call the police and claim everything that’s rightfully yours? How does that sales man at the Pawn Shop feel? No way the thief will come forward and admit unless there is proof he is guilty. Worse yet if the thief come to your farm with friends… I’m sure you would complain or kick their ass! Kind of like what the Hawaiian Kingdom and USA is about? Kind of what the protest on Mauna Kea was about? Of what you ask about what will happen to the people, government, land, vote, etc etc? Tough questions to answered. Hawaii was doing alright before it was over thrown. The US still wants Hawaii because it’s a strategic point in the Pacific…that was their original reason for the take over in the beginning. Be ready to collect rent at Pearl Harbor…it comes with a price. Our taxes went to the wrong government? Maybe we will get our Federal Taxes Back? Only time will tell what will happen. But like Sai says….First! Education…Education…Education and we see what happens after that…. Maybe one day you and I will stand side by side with the protesters on Mauna Kea? Show me the Treaty! Show me the Title! Aloha

  38. Kelly
    Kelly says:

    While Ha is a proponent of Industrial Ag, his own crops may actually be non GMO. But they are not free of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides. How many dozens of tons of poison has Ha used over the years? Many share his world view that humans have to ‘conquer’ nature to survive.
    And now, as a result, industrial Ag is a primary threat to earth’s ecosystem.
    Worldwide people get that sustainable agriculture is
    NOT Industrial AG.
    Farming methods that work with, not over, nature produce the best food most efficiently.
    But, again, fitting food production to a faulty economic system results in faulty results,
    (poisoned air, water, soil, and food).
    Growing wholesome food to feed our families for life sake, and construct an economic system to fit life.
    That is our job, I think.
    I wear rubber slippers and I’d like Ha to explain his incessant patronizing coded message “rubba slippa folks”.

  39. Kelly
    Kelly says:

    @Ha –
    Flowers may feed the ‘soul’.
    Commercial greenhouse flower production creates a toxic wasteland.
    It can feed the bank account,
    but it is simply poisonous to the aina.

  40. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    Aloha Errol;
    We agree much more than we disagree. I use “rubbah slippah” folks as short for maka’ainana.
    I am maka’ainana and will always be maka’ainana. That’s why I always ask; “what about the rest?” I know a little about growing food, that is why I challenge proposals that sound good but not going work.

  41. Richard Ha
    Richard Ha says:

    I mentioned before that I know what Keanu Sai has said. That is his kuleana and others who are working in that area. I don’t disagree. I just want to know what will life look like when that happens. Its always the same question; “what about the rest?” We are closing our tomato operation down. Not because we want to but because we have to. The hoop houses are 12 years old. And, it costs 3 times as much today to beplace it as it did in 2002. And, the packaging, medical, workers comp cost, etc keeps on going up. Would we borrow money to rebuild it when we know not going work? We have survived for 35 years. When its time to move, its time to move.

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