‘Bringing the Legacy of Katsu Goto to Life’

Discover the story about Katsu Goto, an early Japanese immigrant who came to Hawai‘i in 1885 aboard the City of Tokio, the first ship of the Kanyaku Imin (contract laborers) to work on the sugar plantations in Hawai‘i. After enduring a three-year labor contract at Soper, Wright & Co. along the Hamakua coast of Hawai‘i Island, Goto became a succimageessful businessman and labor leader. He was killed via a lynching in Honoka‘a, Hawai‘i in 1889 while helping Japanese sugar plantation workers.

“Bringing the Legacy of Katsu Goto to Life” is the first documentary of his story presented by the Katsu Goto Memorial Committee (KGMC) of the Honokaa Hongwanji Mission. This special is a 25-minute preview as well as a behind the scenes look at the “making of” the documentary on Katsu Goto featuring a fundraising campaign to document his story on film. The preview will run four times on Nippon Golden Network (NGN Channel 677):

? 9:35 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016

? 12 a.m. Sunday, Jan 3, 2016

? 6 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 3, 2016

? 3:15 p.m. Sunday, Jan 3, 2016

The previews are airing during the Nippon Golden Network “Freeview” period (Dec. 30 – Jan. 3) when NGN will be available for free to all Oceanic Time Warner subscribers in the state of Hawai‘i. Interviews will be captioned for Japanese and English speakers.

In the preview, experience interviews with his descendants, academic and historical scholars, community members and the film’s production team.

“As a film director, you look for those really beautiful stories that come together to make a movie and I think we really have those powerful stories in this film,” says Director and Editor Danny Miller.

“We still have new immigrants coming to Hawai‘i all the time so it is important for us to remember our history so we do not repeat some of the mistakes we have made in the past,” said Baron Sekiya, producer and writer.

It was Goto’s knowledge of the English language and Western laws that thrust him into his role as a bridge between Japanese contract laborers and plantation management as he fought for workers’ rights. “I feel that my life is in danger by being here . . . but I am not afraid,” said Goto while meeting Japanese laborers accused by plantation management of arson of a canefield, according to court documents. Goto was ambushed then lynched from a telephone pole in the town of Honoka‘a after this late night meeting.

Goto’s death in 1889 at 27 was tragic, but his legacy didn’t end there. Dr. Fumiko Kaya, Goto’s niece and a survivor of the bombing of Hiroshima, learned about the lynching of her uncle in 1985. Kaya admirably turned the tragedy into the Goto of Hiroshima Foundation in 1993 to benefit Hawai‘i scholars and improve cross cultural communication. The foundation continues today through the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa’s American Studies Department.

The KGMC is now seeking individual, foundation, corporate or organizational sponsors to provide production and completion funds and welcomes your participation to bring this important story to film. Executive Producer and Writer Patsy Iwasaki strongly believes “His story has become a legacy. It’s a Hawai‘i story, it’s an immigrant story, it’s a national story, it’s a story that needs to be told.”

If you have any questions or for more information, please contact Patsy Iwasaki at patsy@KatsuGotoMovie.org. The KGMC was created under the fiscal sponsorship of the Honokaa Hongwanji Mission, an affiliate of the Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawai‘i, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. To make a tax deductible contribution to the Katsu Goto film project, please make checks payable to: Katsu Goto Memorial Committee, ? Honoka‘a Hongwanji Mission, P.O. Box 1667, Honoka‘a, HI 96727 or you can make a contribution via Paypal on the website: KatsuGotoMovie.org

Waimea Ocean Film Festival Is Jan. 1-8

Welcome the New Year with a superb lineup of films, special guests, intimate coffee talks, Q&As, exhibits and more January 1-8 at the 2016 Waimea Ocean Film Festival (Ocean Film).

Find the 2016 program posted online, where you can also purchase festival passes, at www.waimeaoceanfilm.org. Program copies and pass sales will be available starting 9 a.m.-3 p.m. December 31 at the festival hospitality desk at Kahilu Theatre in Waimea. Also find programs at concierge desks at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, Hapuna Prince Beach Hotel, The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i and Four Seasons Resort Hualalai.

Films are shown starting 9:30 a.m. January 1, and play simultaneously January 1-4 at multiple venues in Waimea (Kahilu, HPA Gates and Parker Theatres), plus at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i. The festival moves to Four Seasons Resort Hualalai the evening of January 4, where passes will also be sold.

Ocean Film brings over 60 extraordinary films to the big screen this year, most of which are world, U.S., Hawai‘i or Big Island premieres, with many filmmakers in attendance to answer questions following the showing of each film. The format of this dynamic festival immerses participants in a greater understanding and awareness of the ocean and island culture through exceptional films, talks, exhibits and activities. Films fall into the basic categories of ocean experience (such as surfing and paddling); ocean environment—including things we do on land that impact the sea; and island culture. Inspirational films and films that shed light on who we are, or give pause for thought, form part of the mix.

The Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel is offering discounted room rates to festival pass holders from January 2-11.

For the latest updates on films and speakers, follow the festival on Facebook, www.facebook.com/waimeaoceanfilmfestival, visit www.waimeaoceanfilm.org or email info@waimeaoceanfilm.org.

The Waimea Ocean Film Festival is a 501c3 organization made possible through the support of patrons, sponsors and the community. Mahalo to the 2016 Ocean Film partners: Four Seasons Resort Hualalai, The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i, the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel, Holualoa Inn, Matson, K2 Imaging, Sushi Rock, Palani French Bakers, Big Island Brewhaus, Big Island Traveler, Maile Charters, Starbucks Coffee, Anna Ranch Heritage Center, Hawaii Preparatory Academy (HPA), Parker School, West Hawaii Today, Hawaii Tribune Herald, Kona Law, Emily T Gail Show, The Beach FM and The Wave FM.

***Commentary*** Speculation On The Puna Hot Seat; Here Comes Campaign Season

My initial thoughts upon reading that State Sen. Russell Ruderman is seeking re-election rather than pursue the Council District 4 seat he was said to be eyeing:

Campaign season is upon us! The state Senate seat for Puna is going to be one hot race, with Ruderman seeking to keep his seat after one term, and Greggor Ilagan officially seeking the Puna Senate seat after two terms as the lower Puna councilman. In the most generalized sneak peak, I see a major scrap ahead between environmentalists and biotech/GMO defenders. While that promises to be a lively race to watch, the Council seats in Puna and beyond are going to be sought by a whole cast of characters, as you can imagine. Then there is the mayor’s race ahead. The peanut gallery is going to be a hoot, that’s for damn sure. — Tiffany Edwards Hunt

***Commentary*** Proposed Resolution Calling For The Opening Of Railroad Avenue Between HPP And Nanawale Estates

I lost the election to the Hawaii County Council, but I can still try and write some legislation, at least a resolution for God sakes. Following is:
A resolution calling for the immediate opening of Railroad Avenue between HPP and Nanawale Estates.
Whereas, an improvement to Railroad Avenue between HPP and Nanawale occurred in 2014 as a result of lava threatening to inundate Pahoa Village;
Whereas, HPP homeowners consented to the use of the subdivisions roads to access this connector road between HPP and Nanawale;
Whereas, to respect HPP homeowners, the County of Hawaii agreed to open up this newly improved connector road for emergency purposes;
Whereas, the State of Hawaii has started on construction of a roundabout at the intersection of Highway 130 and Pahoa Village Road;
Whereas, the detour route takes the traffic down Pahoa Village Road and Kahakai Boulevard, both two-lane roads considered substandard in terms of modern road construction requirements;
Whereas, traffic is backing up as far as Ainaloa subdivision, several miles from Pahoa Village, as a result of the roundabout construction;
Whereas, the people of lower Puna are not only inconvenienced by the traffic backup, emergency responders are having a difficult time responding to calls for service in a timely manner;
Whereas, the traffic backup experienced with the roundabout construction is begging a solution;
Whereas, Railroad Avenue between HPP and Nanawale Estates must be opened to alleviate the traffic backup on Highway 130…
Now therefore it is so…

— Tiffany Edwards Hunt

***Commentary*** Open Up Railroad Avenue To Alleviate Roundabout Construction Congestion

Open letter to the mayor and Hawaii County Council:

As of Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 3, Pahoa residents are adjusting to a new normal, detouring on the original Pahoa Village Road while the roundabout construction is underway on Highway 130. We are all going to have to learn how to plan for the traffic backup that is occurring as a result of this bottleneck that is happening at the ingress and egress to Pahoa Marketplace and also at the intersection of Pahoa Village Road and Kahakai Boulevard.
I would like to urge you to consider opening up the Railroad Avenue detour route you created last year when lava was threatening to inundate Pahoa Village Road.
While, as a small business owner in Pahoa Village, I would like to see more traffic flowing through town, I understand the frustration people are experiencing to be backed up on the highway as they approach Pahoa Village Road, having already experienced the Keaau Crawl in Highway 130 on their afternoon-evening commute. For those traveling to Hawaiian Beaches or Nanawale or down to Kapoho, it might provide a great relief to have another option to get home. This may alleviate the urge to kick the dog, after a long day and a lot of commute time.
Please consider opening up Railroad Avenue between HPP and Nanawale — it’s the right thing to do.
Mahalo.
Tiffany Edwards Hunt
Pahoa

Puna News — PCMC To Expand Its Services

(Media release) — Puna Community Medical Center is expanding its services to the community in several ways:

Our Medivan, which has been parked across from Pahoa High School since last year, has now been driven down to Kalani Honua, where it will see patients on the first and third Fridays of every month from 9 am to 1

pm. Dr. Hart Miller will provide the same services as at our Pahoa clinic, including urgent and acute care, school and job physicals and referrals. No appointment will be needed. Patients should bring their insurance card, if they are covered. This is being done as a feasibility demonstration project to determine if it is (a) needed by the coastal community, and (b) economically viable. At the end of the one year cycle we will have enough data to determine if the project should be dropped, continued as is, or expanded. A big mahalo to Kalani Honua for hosting this project and to councilman Ilagan for providing start-up funding from his District 4 Contingency fund.

Our urgent care clinic at the Pahoa Marketplace will also be staying open longer. We will be open on Christmas Day and on New Years Day from 8:00 am to noon. And we will increase our Sunday hours to 5:00 pm starting January 3rd (although we will still be closed for staff lunch).

Future plans to continue expansion of services are being finalized, as the logistics have to be worked out regarding shift changes and staffing, but we will be moving our current 5:00 pm closing time to 7:00 pm and staying open through the lunch hour on weekdays. This will help our working people get the medical care they need without losing time at work or their sick leave. Date for this change will be announced.

We have signed a 65 year lease for state land on Hwy. 130 and are now waiting for the governor to sign it. At that point drivers will see a banner in front of the property, announcing “Future Home of Puna Community Medical Center’s Emergency Dept. & Medical Park”. The emergency facility will be the first increment. Future plans may include a Birthing Center, Senior Day Care, Dental Clinic, Dialysis Center, or other components on an as-needed and/or fundable basis.

PCMC continues to honor its commitment to provide medical services to the Puna community. We will keep doing it until Puna no longer has a federal designation as a “Medically Underserved Area”. Want to help? Contact president@punahealth.org. (Rene Siracusa)

***Commentary*** A Proposed Solution To The Pahoa Roundabout Construction Traffic

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Open letter to Mayor Billy Kenoi and the Hawaii County Council:

As of Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 2, Pahoa residents are adjusting to a new normal, detouring on the original Pahoa Village Road while the roundabout construction is underway on Highway 130. We are all going to have to learn how to plan for the traffic backup that is occurring as a result of this bottleneck that is happening at the ingress and egress to Pahoa Marketplace and also at the intersection of Pahoa Village Road and Kahakai Boulevard.

I would like to urge you to consider opening up the Railroad Avenue detour route you created last year when lava was threatening to inundate Pahoa Village Road.
While, as a small business owner in Pahoa Village, I would like to see more traffic flowing through town, I understand the frustration people are experiencing to be backed up on the highway as they approach Pahoa Village Road, having already experienced the Keaau Crawl on Highway 130 on their afternoon-evening commute. For those traveling to Hawaiian Beaches or Nanawale or down to Kapoho, it might provide a great relief to have another option to get home. This may alleviate the urge to kick the dog, after a long day and a lot of commute time.
Please consider opening up Railroad Avenue between HPP and Nanawale — it’s the right thing to do.
Mahalo.
Tiffany Edwards Hunt
Pahoa

Letters — Roundabout for Pahoa – Thanks a lot for nothing!

Oh great, the first day DOT is starting to work on the roundabout, and now traffic is backed up from Ainaloa just trying to get into Pahoa. Can’t imagine how we are going to survive this. Puna should have had an alternate route since at least 1998, and the Planning Department and DOT has been discriminating against us for too long now. If we had an alternate route, half the people could be taking that instead of waiting and waiting and waiting for our 4 lanes of traffic to be crammed through a single-lane roundabout. Who is in charge here? Can you make any bigger mess? Oh, right, Puna residents have tons of free time to wait in traffic… we’re all just hippies and don’t matter to the folks in Hilo or Oahu.

You better hope there are no accidents on the Pahoa side as emergency services can’t get through!

Sara Steiner