Tsunami Advisory Cancelled

From County of Hawaii Civil Defense:

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has cancelled the  Tsunami Advisory for the State of Hawaii.  Beginning at approximately 3:20 this morning, sea level changes and increased wave heights were observed.  Since that time no damages have been reported and conditions have continued to subside and improve. Based on the cancellation of the advisory and improved conditions an all clear is issued for Hawaii Island effective at 8:00 AM this morning. All beach parks are open.

Civil Defense’s Latest Tsunami Message

From County of Hawaii Civil Defense:

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has issued a Tsunami Advisory for the State of Hawaii effective 3:24PM this afternoon.  An earthquake with a magnitude of 8.3 occurred off the coast of Chile.  A tsunami advisory is issued due to the threat of a potential changes in sea level and strong currents which may be dangerous to those in or near the water. The threat may continue for several hours after the arrival of the initial waves or sea level changes, however significant widespread inundation is not expected for areas under an advisory.  Presently, the initial arrival of any wave action or sea level changes and currents for Hawaii Island is expected around 3:00am tomorrow morning and may last for several hours.  Again, widespread inundation is not expected.  This will be the last information update unless conditions change.

More Flooding News….

Hawaii Police Department reports that Highway 11 is closed between the 58 and 59 mile markers (Kawa Flats).  This closure is between Pahala and Na’alehu in the Ka’u District.

Hualalai Road between Hinalole Street and Queen Kaahumanu Hwy in Kailua-Kona is now open, but motorists are urged to proceed with caution.  Kuakini Highway, which had also been closed, is now open again.

 

No Hurricane, but Flash Flood watch and High Surf Anyway

From County of Hawaii Civil Defense:

This is a Weather and High Surf Warning Information Update for Thursday September 3rd at 7:30AM.

As of 5:00AM this morning, Hurricane Jimena was located 720 miles east of Hilo and moving in a northwest direction at 5 miles per hour.  No watches or warnings have been issued at this for Jimena and the system is being monitored closely.

Due to unstable weather conditions across the state, the National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood watch for all islands effective through midnight tonight. Localized heavy rains and possible thunder showers can be expected.  Motorists are advised to drive with caution and to be prepared for hazardous conditions to include ponding and run off and to anticipate traffic delays.

The High Surf Warning for the east facing shores of Hawaii Island remains in effect through 6:00PM tonight. Dangerous surf conditions continue to be observed and reported across areas of East Hawaii.  Surf heights of 10-15 feet are forecast for the east facing shores of Hawaii Island.  Residents along the coast and in low lying areas are advised to take necessary precautions.  Beachgoers swimmers and surfers are advised to exercise caution and to heed all advice given by Ocean Safety Officials.  All beaches and roadways are open at this time.

 

Ignacio Track Gets Further Away; County Leaves Shelters Closed

From County of Hawaii Civil Defense:

“As of 2:00 PM this afternoon Hurricane Ignacio was continuing on a northwest track at 12 miles per hour and remains a category 3 hurricane.  Ignacio was located approximately 380 miles east of Hilo and recording sustained winds of 115 miles per hour with higher gusts.  Hurricane force winds extend outwards from the center up to 30 miles and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 160 miles.

“Although the National Weather Service Tropical Storm Watch for Hawaii Island remains in effect, the present track and gradual weakening of Ignacio is presenting with an anticipated reduced threat to Hawaii Island.  Based on the anticipated and forecasted improved outlook, evacuation centers will not be opened at this time.  The Civil Defense Agency will continue to maintain close communication with the National Weather Service and monitor the system.

“All DOE public schools and private schools will be open tomorrow.

“In addition all government offices will be open for normal business; including the Hele-On Bus system.

“The High Surf Warning issued for the east facing shores of Hawaii Island will remain in effect through 6:00PM Tuesday evening.  Surf heights are expected to increase today and build to possibly 15 to 20 feet.  Residents in low lying coastal areas and boat owners are advised to take necessary precautions.

“Please monitor your local radio broadcasts for additional updates. “

Ignacio Still Category 4 but Tropical Storm Winds Expected Here

Hurricane Ignacio, which strengthened to a dangerous Category 4 Hurricane yesterday, is still a Category 4 today and likely will still  be a full fledged hurricane when it passes North of the Big Island on Monday, though the Natioonal Weather Service does say it will “weaken through Tuesday.” It’s predicted to pass far enough north of us, however, that this island is more likely to get tropical storm force winds and rain. Surf may now reach 15 to 20 feet.

Here’s the 5 a.m.  Hawaii County Civil Defense notice:

“The National weather Service Tropical Storm Watch for Hawaii Island remains in effect. Hawaii Island could begin to experience tropical storm conditions starting late tonight and into early tomorrow. As of 5:00 AM this morning Hurricane Ignacio remains a category 4 hurricane and was located approximately 450 miles east of Hilo and moving in a northwest direction at 9 miles per hour. Currently Ignacio is recording sustained winds of 140 miles per hour with higher gusts. Hurricane force winds extend outwards from the center up to 30 miles and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 125 miles.

“A High Surf Warning has been issued for the east facing shores of Hawaii Island through 6:00PM Tuesday evening. Surf heights are expected to increase today and building to possibly 15 to 20 feet. Residents in low lying coastal areas and boat owners are advised to take necessary precautions.

“Based on the current forecast track and possible impacts, emergency shelters will be opened later today and the public is advised to monitor upcoming radio messages for information on shelter locations and sites. Information will also be posted on the Hawaii County Civil Defense web site at http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/civil-defense/.

“The Civil Defense Agency will continue to maintain close communication with the National Weather Service and monitor the system. The community is encouraged to take the time to prepare early for possible storm impacts that could include high surf, strong winds, and heavy rains. Please monitor your local radio broadcasts for additional updates.”

The latest storm track. Remember, the white area is the predicted cone of possibility of the passage of the storm’s eye, not the width of the storm:

5 Day Track for IGNACIO

Th latest enhanced satellite image, which gives a better idea of the scale of the storm:

Satellite Images for IGNACIO

 

 

Storm Watch Declared; Ignacio Now Category 3 Hurricane

At  5:00 a.m. today,  the National Weather Service issued a Tropical Storm Watch for the Big Island because of Hurricane Ignacio. Ignacio, currently a Category 3 Hurricane with sustained windsos 115 miles per hour near its core, is still predicted to pass a little to the north of the Hawaii Island chain.

“Hurricane force winds extended  outwards from the center up to 35 miles and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 105 miles,” noted Hawaii Civil Defense.

A Tropical Storm Watch means tropical storm conditions are possible within 48 hours.  This may include high surf and surge, strong winds, and heavy rains.

At the time the watch was issued the storm’s center was approximately 625 miles east/southeast of Hilo and moving in a west/northwest direction at 8 miles per hour.

High Surf Advisory has been issued for both the east and west facing shores of Hawaii Island effective from 6:00 a.m. this morning through 6:00 p.m. tomorrow evening, as waves from both from both Ignacio and former Typhoon Atsani collide in waters near Hawaii Island.   Surf heights of 5 to 8 feet can be expected on Saturday, and 10 to 14 feet on Sunday.

“Residents in low lying coastal areas and boat owners are advised to take necessary precautions and to complete all preparations by noon today.  Emergency personnel will be conducting door to door notifications in surf and surge vulnerable areas of Kapoho in the Puna District and parts of Hilo.”

The National Weather Service is forecasting “Tropical Storm Conditions Possible,” from Sunday night through Tuesday. The most current forecast map, below now, shows Ignacio’s core maintaining hurricane strength winds until it’s north of Kauai on Wednesday.

The storm watch area currently covers only Hawaii County, but According to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center, “Watches may required for additional islands later today or tonight.”

The NOAA satellite image below shows Ignacio now with the well-defined eye of a major hurricane:

GOES West Hawaii Visible image

This image map shows the predicted path of the storm.   Note, however, that the conical shape is the “cone of probability,” for the storm path, not the actual size of the storm, which is shown in the satellite image above.

5 Day Track for IGNACIO

Flash Flood Watch Extended; Puna Council Meeting Cancelled

From Hawaaii County Civil Defense at 6:15 p.m., Monday, August 24:

The National Weather Service Flash Flood Watch for Hawaii Island remains in effect.  Due to unstable weather conditions and very moist air across the state, the flash flood watch will remain in effect through 6:00PM tomorrow.

Currently heavy rains and occasional thunder and lighting can be expected across all areas of the island.

With the ongoing upper slope rains and runoff, Highway 11 near the Whittington Beach Park in Ka’u is experiencing intermittent road closure due to flooding conditions.  Presently the highway is open to one lane traffic; however, motorists are advised to avoid the area and to use alternate routes if possible.

All other major highways and roadways are opened at this time however motorists are advised to drive carefully and to be prepared for hazardous conditions, ponding, and runoff, and to anticipate traffic delays.

Lastly, in consideration of the hazardous road conditions, the joint Puna Council public meeting scheduled for tonight at the Mt. View School has been cancelled.

Flash Flood Warning Issued; Hwy. 11 Closed in Ka’u

From t County of Hawaii Civil Defense:

The National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood Warning for Hawaii Island effective through 12:30PM this afternoon.  Heavy rain fall is expected in various areas of West Hawaii from South Kona through North Kohala.  Many of these areas have experienced significant rainfall over the past days and may be prone to flooding.

 Due to heavy runoff and flooding, Highway 11 near the Whittington Beach Park in Kau  is closed to all traffic.  The road closure extends from Punaluu to Naalehu.  Motorists are advised to avoid the area and to use alternate routes if possible.  All other major highways and roadways are open at this time, however motorists are advised to drive carefully and to be prepared for hazardous conditions to include  ponding and runoff, and to anticipate traffic delays.

 The Flash Flood Watch for Hawaii Island remains in effect.  Due to unstable weather conditions and very moist air across the state, the flash flood watch will remain in effect through 6:00 p.m. tonight.

Floods, Thunder–but not a “Tropical Storm”–Hit Big Island

Due to unstable weather conditions and very moist air across the state, a flash flood watch will remain in effect through 6:00 p.m. tomorrow, Monday, August 24.  As of 6:30 this evening Highway 250,  the Kohala Mountain Road had been closed at the 9-mile mark due to heavy flooding.   Currently heavy rains and thunder and lighting is being reported across parts of West Hawaii from Waimea through Kona.  Residents in the Honoka’a area have reported close lightning strikes on Facebook.

Civil Defens reports that “North Kohala traffic is being detoured through the Kohala Ranch Subdivision. All other major highways and roadways are opened at this time however motorists are advised to drive carefully and to be prepared for hazardous conditions, ponding, and runoff,  and to anticipate traffic delays.

The current weather on the island is not, however, part of an organized tropical storm.  The nearest such storm, Tropical Depression Kilo, is currently over 800 miles west-southwest of Hilo, and its current projected path takes it well to the west of all the main Hawaiian Islands.

Flash Flood Watch Continues

As the remnants of Tropical Depression Hilda continue to soak both East and West Hawaii, Hawaii County Civil Defense has reported that the Flash Flood Watch already in force here “is expected to remain through late tonight….  Heavy rains and thunder showers are being reported across parts of east and west Hawaii and  including areas along Saddle Road.   Some ponding and run off is occurring.  Residents in flood prone areas are advised to take necessary precautions and motorists are advised to drive carefully and prepare for possible hazardous conditions and traffic delays.   Presently all major highways and roadways are open.  Everyone is advised to remain out of streams and drainages as sudden flash flooding is possible.”

Park Reopens Campground, Back Country

With Tropical Depression Hilda slowly winding down and forecast wind speeds decreasing, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park officials ha have re-opened all previous storm-related closures within the park.

 The backcountry areas and summit of Mauna Loa, the remote coastal sites from ‘Apua Point to Ka‘aha, Hilina Pali Road and Kulanaokuaiki Campground, Mauna Loa Road, and Namakanipaio Campground and A-frame cabins are now open. Heavy rain is still expected through Saturday, however, and park visitors should drive with caution. A flash flood watch is still in effect for the entire island.

The park has, however, extended its closure of the 700-foot exit trail from Thurston Lava Tube, as workers repave the trail following the replacement of an underground power cable. The lava tube remains open, and the trail that leads into it will be used as both exit and entry. Escape Road, from Highway 11 to Thurston Lava Tube, will continue to be closed during the repaving project. The paving project  is scheduled to be completed by Fri., Aug. 21.

Flash Flood Watch Still in Efect

A flash flood watch remains in effect as the remnants of Hurricane Hilda, now a tropical depression, muddle their way past the islands.

According to he 5 a.m. update from Hawaii County Civil Defense,   “The Flash Flood watch is expected to remain through 6:00 AM Saturday morning.  As the remnants of Tropical Depression Hilda continues to track to the south of Hawaii Island heavy rains and thunder showers are expected and may result in flooding conditions.  Heavy rains and thunder showers are being reported across parts of east Hawaii.  Some ponding and run off is occurring.  Residents in flood prone areas are advised to take necessary precautions and motorists are advised to drive carefully and prepare for possible hazardous conditions and traffic delays.   Currently all Public and private schools will be open however some charter schools may be closed due to the weather conditions.  Parents of students in Charter School programs are advised to contact your school for information on school closure or schedule changes.  Presently all major highways and roadways are open.  Everyone is advised to remain out of streams and drainages as sudden flash flooding is possible.   Additional updates may be posted and broadcast as conditions change.  Please monitor your local radio broadcast for updates.”

2 AM Hilda Report: Less Wind, More Rain

The latest satellite images and forecasts on Tropical Storm Hilda show the system becoming less organized and predict a path farther south of the island, but the storm is still capable of dumping a lot of rain on the island–partly because it’s moving so slowly.  As of 2 a.m. the storm was 165 miles Southwest of Hilo and moving northwest at about 5 MPH. “This slow motion is expected to continue on Wednesday with a gradual forwad motion and a turn to he west on Wednesday night and Thursday,’ reads the Pacific Hurricane Center’s 2 a.m. public advisory. Maximum sustained winds have now dropped to 45 MPH, with “stronger gusts.”  But the storm still poses substantial dangers, especially from surf and flash flooding. “Swells associated with Tropical Storm Hiloda will produce large ad potentially life threatening surf along east and southeast facing shores of portions of the Hawaiian islands over the next day or two,” said the advisory.  “Hilda may produce 6 to 12 inches of rainfall.  Maximum values of up to 18 inches possible…. These rains could result in life threatening flash floods across portions of the Hawaiian Islands late into Saturday.”

A tropical storm watch remains in effect for Hawaii County. The storm is now expected to degrade to a tropical depression by late Wednesday evening.

Satellite Images for HILDA

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