Center Offers Mediation Training

Hilo’s Ku`ikahi Mediation Center still has room for more enrollees in its next Basic Mediation Training, which will take place over two weekends, September 12-13 and 19-20, at the Aging and Disability Resource Center, 1225 Kinoole St., Hilo. The 30-hour training session, which runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sundays, “offers instruction in the process of mediation and how to apply advanced communication skills–such as active listening, summarizing and reframing, and using open-ended questions–in order to help people resolve their differences.” Participants learn how to use mediation techniques to manage and resolve conflict, communicate more effectively, become more effective negotiators and problem solvers, and contribute to conflict resolution in their homes, business places and communities.
“People in conflict often focus on each other as the problem, going head to head. Mediation helps people focus on the issues, not on each other, so they can see that they have a joint problem to solve,” noted an e-mail flyer on the training. “Whether you want to improve your peacemaking and communication skills or want to become a mediator, this training gives you the tools you need to start resolving conflict in a peaceful and lasting way.
No particular background or personality is needed–all are welcome!”
The course will be taught by Diane Petropulos & Catherine Lampton. Cost, including training materials, is $295 but partial scholarships are available; to get an application form, e-mail gail@hawaiimediation.org. For more information, call (808) 935-7844
ext. 9.

Kawaihae Harbor Community Meeting

Representative Cindy Evans will be holding a meeting regarding South Kawaihae Recreational Harbor and North Kawaihae Recreational Harbor on Saturday September 19 from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. at the Kawaihae Canoe Club. 

 Officials from the Department of Land and Natural Resources Boating Division will give an overview of the South Kawaihae Harbor and future plans for the North Kawaihae Harbor. Community input is encouraged and there will be a Q & A to follow.

 Some of the items that will be discussed are: damages from flooding, anything outstanding with the US Corps of Engineers, the boat ramp for South Boat Harbor, security measures, possibility of mooring buoys at South Boat Harbor, update on road, waterline, and master plan for South Kawaihae Harbor, breakwater at North Kawaihae harbor, needs for North Kawaihae Harbor, and storm water runoff at North Kawaihae Harbor

 Working with her Hawaii Island colleagues,  Evans shepherded a $400,000 appropriation this past legislative session for North Kawaihae Boat Harbor.

 “This meeting is an opportunity to identify what improvements are needed to make the harbor safe and more functional for the enjoyment of all who enjoy the ocean.  And I strongly encourage the public to come to the meeting to provide their thoughts on issues and priorities they feel are important for the harbor,” said Evans.

 Evans serves as House Majority Floor Leader and represents House District 7 (North Kona, South Kohala, and North Kohala).

Ching Foundation Sponsors “Inspired in Hawaii” Contest for Students

The Clarence T. C. Ching Foundation has announced its
Sixth Annual “Inspired in Hawaii” Essay, Poster and Video Contest
The contest encourages Hawaii’s students to “dream big and make Hawaii a better place.” This year’s contest, which is open to students in Kindergarten through Grade 12 who are current residents of the state of
Hawaii,  offers $10,000 in cash awards for winning students and their teachers.

Poster and Essay Division Awards:
First Place: $125 student, $50 teacher
Second Place: $100 student, $50 teacher
Third Place: $50 student, $50 teacher
Video Division Awards*:
First Place: $300 team, $100 teacher
Second Place: $250 team, $100 teacher
Third Place $200 team, $100 teacher
Fourth Place $150 team, $100 teacher
Fifth Place: $100 team, $100 teacher

Students may enter only one division.
Essay Division: Grades 6-12, individual
Poster Division: Grades K-12, individual
Video Division: Grades 7-12, individual or team entries

Each entry must identify an existing problem in Hawaii and offer a thoughtful solution to the problem. Go to the Web site for rules, entry forms, prizes, judging criteria and information on Clarence T.C. Ching. You can also see last year’s winning entries there.
Entries must be received no later than 4:00 p. m. on Friday, November 6, 2015. Mail or deliver entries to:

ATTN: Inspired in Hawaii Contest, The Clarence T. C. Ching Foundation, 1001 Bishop Street, Suite 770, Honolulu, HI 96813

If there’s a question that isn’t answered at the Web site, contestants can email contest coordinator saraplatte@mac.com.

Award winners will be contacted through their schools and invited to an awards program in February 2016.

Ukes as Art at Wailoa Center

The Big Island Ukulele Guild’s annual exhibit will open Friday October 2 at Wailoa Center in Hilo at 5 p.m. The formal opening will feature live music, pupus, and a drawing for a free ukulele and will close at 8 p.m. This exhibit, which featured over 50 handmade instruments last year, will also feature other invitational pieces from Woodworkers across the Island, including furniture, sculpture, and turned bowls. Show is open Mon. -Fri. from 9am – 4:30pm. The exhibit was hailed as the best-attended show of 2013.

The public is invited to join in the fun for the formal opening, or to come see the show throughout the month, vote for their favorite ukulele for the People’s Choice Award, and join in ukulele kanikapila (jam sessions) on Saturdays October 3rd with Alan Hale, and 17th with Keoki Kahomoku, from 12 until 3 p.m. On Saturday October 10th, members of the Ukulele Guild will lead demonstrations for the public. The exhibit will close October 29th.

The Big Island Ukulele Guild was started in 2001, and is comprised of about 50 members. The primary focus of the Guild is to promote ukulele making by sharing information between builders. Many of the members build as a hobby, while about ten percent build professionally. Any interested person can become a guild member. Members meet four times a year at varying locations across the island to share food, kanikapila, and most importantly, a central presentation on some aspect of ukulele building.

For more information about the Ukulele Guild or upcoming exhibit, contact coordinator  Dave Stokes (808) 989-8890 or visit The Guild website BigIslandUkuleleGuild.org

For more information about the Wailoa Art Center, contact (808) 933-0416.

Free Talks Offered on Roundup and Public Health

Seeds of Truth and GMO-Free Hawaii Island are sponsoring a talk on “Connecting the Dots: the rise of Glyphosate, the active ingredient I the commonly used herbicide ‘Roundup’ and the link to the increase in diseases” with Drs. Stephanie Seneff and Judy Carman, on Saturday, July 25, 1:30-5 p.m. at Tutu’s House in Waimea; on Sunday, July 26, 6-9 p.m. at NHERC’s headquarters on 45-539 Plumeria St. in Honoka’a; and at the Kona County Council Chambers and at 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway in Kailua-Kona. Dr. Senoff, a researcher at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has traced links between Glyphosate and the rise of diseases such as obesity, Alzheimer’s, allergies and autism. Dr. Carman, who holds a PhD in medicine, nutritional biochemistry and metabolic regulation, was involved in some of the first independent animal feeding studies on the to investigate the safety of GMO crops in regard to human health. The talks are free, and pupus will be served.

A petition for the County of Hawaii to stop spraying Roundup on public roadsides has been started here.

HVNP Unveils August After “Dark in the Park” Offerings

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park has released its August schedule for its After Dark in the Park series. On tap for the month are a hula performance, an introduction to the ukulele, and a tour of Kilauea’s night skies from the viewpoint of artist/professional guide Kent Olsen.  All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply and a $2 donation is welcomed to help support park programs.

H?lau O Mailelaulani is a Hilo based h?lau under the direction of kumu hula Mailelaulani Canario. Kumu Mailelaulani established her h?lau in the mid 1970’s to perpetuate the ancient (kahiko) as well as modern style of hula. Today, her ‘auana or modern style hula performers take part in the annual Merrie Monarch festivities and are regular entertainers for the cruise ships through Destination Hilo. The h?lau placed third in the 32nd annual Kupuna Hula Festival, Wahine Group Competition held in Kona in 2014. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ N? Leo Manu, “Heavenly Voices” performances. Free.
When: Wed., August 19 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: K?lauea Visitor Center auditorium

‘Ukulele Lessons. Learn about the history of this world-famous instrument that plays a significant role in contemporary Hawaiian music. Join rangers from Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park as they share their knowledge and love of the Hawaiian culture. Learn how to play a simple tune on the ‘Ukulele and leave with a new skill and treasured ‘ike (wisdom) to share with your hoa (friends) and ‘ohana (family). Free.
When: Wed., August 26 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: K?lauea Visitor Center l?nai

K?lauea’s Night Skies: An Artist’s Perspective.  Hawai‘i Island artist and interpretive guide, Kent Olsen draws on insights and perspectives developed through years of work in the medical imaging design field; as an interpretive guide at Mauna Kea Observatories and as a certified commercial guide at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park to “present the night skies over K?lauea Volcano in a way that is sure to provide a new perspective and may just change the way you see everything. Utilizing the current lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u Crater as a point of reference, you will journey from the depths of the quantum realm to the edge of the cosmos.”
When: Tues., August 11 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: K?lauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Climate Change Expert to Speak at Environment Hawaii Anniversary Celebration

Chip Fletcher, one of the nation’s foremost experts in climate change and its effects on coasts, will be the featured speaker on August 14, when Environment Hawai`i celebrates its 25th anniversary with a dinner, live music by JazzX2, and a silent auction featuring works by local craftspeople and artists.

Fletcher, who has authored a number of books, including Living on the Shores of Hawai`i and Climate Change: What the Science Tells Us, will speak on “Climate Crisis: Review and Update.” He serves as the associate dean for academic affairs and a full professor at the UH-Manoa’s School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology,

For a quarter century, Environment Hawai`i has brought its readers award-winning environmental investigative reporting.  The monthly non-commercial newsletter is supported by subscriptions and donations from readers.

Reservations are needed by Tuesday, August 11. For more information: call the Environment Hawai`i office at 934-0115; email ptummons@gmail.com; or visit http://www.environment-hawaii.org.

Richardson Roughwater Swim Set for July 26

The 28th Annual Richardson Roughwater Swim will be held Sunday, July 26, at Richardson Ocean Park in the Keaukaha area of Hilo.

Sponsored by the Hawaii County Department of Parks and Recreation, the 1-mile-long race is designed for strong, experienced swimmers. Competitors may experience ocean swells, powerful currents and waves breaking over the outside reef.

Those who register by Friday, July 17 get a discounted rate of $15 per person. A late-entry fee of $25 per swimmer will apply after that deadline.

Entry forms are available at all County of Hawai‘i swimming pools and the Department’s Recreation Office located within Aunty Sally Kaleohano’s L?‘au Hale at 799 Pi‘ilani Street in Hilo.

For more information call 961-8694 from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. weekdays.

“Laugh Under the Stars” to Help Prevent Bullying

Belly Dancers to Descend on Honolulu

The 2015 Hawai‘i Belly Dance Convention will bring performers and teachers from near and far to Honolulu to share the beauty and drama of Middle Eastern dance October 8-12.
 
“This year will be the best yet, bringing some of the best belly dancers in the world to Honolulu to share their knowledge and passion with dancers and dance lovers alike,” said convention founder Malia Delapenia. “We hope you’ll join us this October.”
 
Featured visiting performers and instructors include Moria Chappell, a tribal fusion belly dancer from Washington DC; Shahrzad, an Oriental belly dancer from Virginia, and belly dance royalty Princess Farhana from Los Angeles as well as Andrea Aranda from San Francisco and Draconis from Texas.
 
Festivities start on October 8 with the no-host HBDC Welcome Gathering from 3:00 – 6:00 p.m. at the beachside Hau Tree Bar at Waikiki’s Hilton Hawaiian Village (2005 Kalia Road).
 
The dancing kicks off with the Shimmy Showcase Gala on Friday, October 9 at the Honolulu Museum of Art’s Doris Duke Theatre (900 S. Beretania Street). The Shimmy Showcase is an opportunity for convention participants to see their teachers in action, and for everyone to appreciate the art of Middle Eastern dance. The two shows will be preceded by a no-host reception with special preview performances. “Essence” the 6 p.m. show, will be a family-friendly show that traces the once traditional movements of belly dance to its contemporary existence. “The Reveal” will continue the modern exploration with more edgy, sensual, fusion performances for an audience 18 years and older at 8 p.m.
 
The Shimmy with Aloha Workshops, now in their eighth year, will be held at the Neal Blaisdell Center on Saturday and Sunday, October 10 and 11. The workshops will cover topics ranging from Folkloric Dance (Shaabi, Egyptian Saidi, and Lebanese Dabke) to tribal and modern fusion belly dance techniques. The teachers bring decades of experience to each workshop, and offerings will be available for belly dancers at all levels of experience. 
 
Individual workshops are $35-$70. New for 2015, a free Beginners of Belly Dance class will be taught on Sunday from 12:30-1:15 p.m. All ages and levels of experience are welcome and encouraged to share in the love of the art.
 
Just outside the Shimmy with Aloha Workshops at the Neal Blaisdell Center, a marketplace will be set up with belly dance costumes, dance wear, and other Middle Eastern artisans from around the world. Many of these products are not available locally most of the year. The Middle Eastern marketplace will be open to the public from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday and 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sunday, October 10 and 11.
 
Following the Sunday workshops, an official HBDC VIP After Party will be held at Bar 35 in Chinatown (35 North Hotel St.) from 8:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. The after party will feature belly dance and burlesque performances by Lorien Archambeault from California, Nizana from Florida, Vila Donovan, and many more surprises. 
 
The final day of this year’s HBDC, Monday, October 12 will begin with a half day of outdoor adventures with friends old and new. Participants can learn to surf, paddle board, take a ride on a canoe, or just kick back under an umbrella. Waikiki Beach Services is offering a discount for HBDC participants from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.. Book your activities on HawaiiBellyDanceConvention.com.
 
The closing event is new for this year: Reflection is an intimate night of performances and commentary, an opportunity for professional feedback from HBDC’s visiting instructors. From 5:00 – 7:30 p.m. at the Ong King Art Center in Chinatown (184 N King St.), dancers can participate in a question and answer session with the visiting instructors and get feedback on their own performances. This years panel will include Shahrzad Raqs, Moria Chappell, Princess Farhana, and Marshal Bodiker. This forum is open to the public. Dancers wishing to perform must apply. Forms are available on HawaiiBellyDanceConvention.com.

Also new for this year, attendees can save over $100 and gain admission to all HBDC events with the All Access Pass. The $415 pass includes VIP access to the Shimmy Showcase Gala, Shimmy with Aloha Workshops, HBDC VIP After Party, and Reflection.
 
For more information, to purchase tickets for the Shimmy Showcase, or to register for workshops or other convention events, visit HawaiiBellyDanceConvention.com or call (808) 234-1006.
 

Big Island Press Club Sponsors Presentation on The Transparency Initiative

The Big Island Press Club invites the public to a luncheon talk on Thursday, June 18, from noon until 1:30 p.m. at Restaurant Kenichi to hear about The Grassroot Institute’s Transparency Initiative.

The  initiative has broken new ground in shedding a light on holding government in Hawaii accountable. Grassroot has been able to uncover amazing information, which will be uploaded for journalists and the public at OpenHawaii.org.

Among the findings:
? The top ten highest state public pensions for retirees last year.
? The average pension and base salary for every state department.
? The salaries, overtime, and bonus pay, and other information for every county.

Through a series of open records requests, and with the help of the Civil Beat Law Center for the Public Interest, and the Office of Information Practices, Grassroot President Keli’i Akina and policy analyst Joe Kent will review the work that Grassroot Institute has done for a better government, economy, and society in Hawaii.

The institute’s speakers also will share of its struggles to advance transparency in Hawaii, especially with regard to Hawaii County, which has been one of the least transparent counties in terms of salary and overtime pay. In addition, the speakers will review their transparency work with the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and the Employee Retirement System, among other agencies.

“A society built on democracy rests on an informed public. Now more than ever, it’s important that we say “E Hana Kakou, let’s work together,” toward an open and transparent government.,” Akina said.

The Grassroot Institute of Hawaii is a nonprofit 501(c)3 public policy think tank, dedicated to advancing individual liberty, the freemarket, and limited, accountable government.

Reservations are required. The cost of the buffet lunch (chicken katsu, furikake panko salmon, yakisoba, salad, vegetable, beverage) at Restaurant Kenichi, 684 Kilauea Ave., Hilo, is $20.

Register with a credit card at https://bipcgrassrootinstitute.eventbrite.com ($2.09 processing fee) or contact Robert Duerr surf77@mac.com or 808-937-9104. Those interested may also send check to BIPC P. O. Box 1920, Hilo HI 96721, to arrive no later than June 16. Parking is available at Aupuni Center, across the street, for 25 cents per hour.

The Big Island Press Club has been dedicated to journalism and the public’s right to know about the workings of government, business and communities on Hawaii island since 1967.

Natural Farming Meeting Looks at Farming Through the Microscope

The Natural Farming Hawai’i June potluck meeting will be about looking through the microscope to understand the benefits of natural farming down to their smallest detail.

Soil isn’t just a dead medium in which crops grow; it’s a matrix of living things, some beneficial, some harmful.  In healthy soil, microorganisms interact in complimentary ways, but pesticides herbicides fertilizers can disrupt that balance.  The presentation at the meeting will cover how to use the microscope, how to identify bacteria, fungus, and nematodes, and what all this means for soil health.

The potluck meeting takes place on the second Tuesday of each month–in this case, June 9, June 9th, 2015, at  6-8 p.m at the Komohana Ag Research Center in Hilo, Hawai’i.

 

Classic Cars to Invade Hawaii

Expect to see lots vintagecars rolling along Big Island highways from June 25 to July 5.  Members of the Hawai`i Classic Cruisers (HCC) organization will be  bringing their prides and joys  from Michigan, Oregon, Texas, California, Nevada and around the globe, as well as from O’ahu and Maui,  to this island for their triennial “Cruise Paradise” happening.

Participants pay $20 to enter one vehicle and $10 for each vehicle thereafter so that their vehicle entry into all events related to the cuise; they pay their own shipping to get their cars here.  But for spectators, “This is a free, fun, family-oriented 10-day event,” notes the press release for the cruise. “During Cruise Paradise 2012, over 400 classic vehicles geared up for car shows on the Big Island that attracted over 10,000 spectators in Hilo, Kona and Waikoloa.  On July 4, hundreds of cars participating in the cruise will be on display at Hilo’s Bayfront.

The event will contribute to the economy, if not to local air quality;  sponsors anticipate that the cruisers will “burn over 7,500 gallons of fuel, travel over a total of 90,000 miles and spend $23,000 in fuel costs alone. Some vehicles anticipate traveling approximately 600 miles over the 10 days getting about 10-12 miles per gallon of fuel. Car enthusiasts will travel across the island, lodge at various hotels and condominiums, eat at local eateries and shop in our malls, shops and supermarkets.”
For more information, go to  www.hawaiiclassiccruisers.com