Kohala Standoff Ends in Arrest

From the Hawaii Police Department:

A man who had been barricaded in his home since Monday night (July 13) is now in police custody. No one was injured during his arrest. After the Police Department’s Special Response Team converged on the scene, shots were fired by the suspect, who eventually surrendered.

At 4:26 p.m. Tuesday (July 14), 37-year-old Macdon D. Thromman of Kapa?au was taken into custody on multiple offenses and was to be processed at the North Kohala police station. The Area II Criminal Investigations Section is continuing the investigation.

Route 270 in North Kohala, which had been closed in both directions near the 25-mile marker, has now been reopened.

The incident began Monday (July 13), when patrol officers responded to a 7:48 p.m. report of a domestic disturbance at a home on the 53-4200 block of Akoni Pule Highway in Halaula, North Kohala.

Responding officers contacted several neighbors in the area who reported loud yelling and screaming coming from the residence. Several people were then seen running from the house as officers approached from the driveway. A gunshot was fired at the officers, striking one officer in his right forearm.

A woman from the house approached the officers and said she had been shot in her outer thigh by her boyfriend.

Both the officer and the woman were taken to North Hawai?i Community Hospital for treatment of their injuries.

The 37-year-old man barricaded himself in the house.

The Hawai?i Police Department’s Special Response Team responded and neighboring residents were evacuated as a precaution.

The wounded 43-year-old officer is a 14-year veteran with the Hawai?i Police Department. He is listed in stable condition. The 32-year-old woman is also listed in stable condition.

For full details, view this message on the web.

Open Letter to our Legislators: What’s Wrong with the Medical Marijuana Bill

Dear Senator Espero, other Legislators,

The reason you are having so much trouble with the dispensary bill is it is not good for the people of Hawaii. To tell you the truth, the amendments ruin it, and make compliance unaffordable and discriminatory for all but multimillionaires with health licenses.

For one, the definition of a “person” needs to be an actual person, not some shady LLC set up to steal profits from Hawaii residents. One license for one aspect (grow, manufacture, dispense) for one person. Give as many Hawaii residents (not big mainland growers, dispensary owners, pharmaceutical or tobacco companies) a chance to make a good living and people and the State of Hawaii will benefit from your aloha.

Two, if you feel in your heart that sick cancer patients on chemotherapy deserve a bit of chocolate or brownie to take their medicine, then give them the “edibles” from SB 682.

Three, throw away all the amendments (both House and Senate) and revert back to the original HB321. We can’t handle the overkill in compliances, there is a higher price for every unnecessary and burdensome requirement.

Unfortunately, the police, judicial system and NED are still in the grip of “reefer madness,” a self-perpetuating industry of prison for profit and stealing peoples assets through property forfeiture. Remember, the police and narcotics enforcement divisions should be focused on the extreme problems of ice, heroin, cocaine, meth, and other actual crimes like theft, robbery, assault: crimes with actual victims, not the cannabis plant. Please also remind yourself they are not doctors, and they have no business lobbying against laws aimed at giving people access to an allowed plant of their choice.

You as our law makers have got to rise above the money hungry crowd, and do what is right for the 13,000+ medical cannabis patients in the State of Aloha!

Thank you for your attention to this matter!

Sara Steiner
Pahoa, Hawaii

Resident Tased for Drone Use at National Park

A visitor at the Jaggar Museum overlook was Tased and arrested by by a park ranger after allegedly using a drone illegally within park boundaries.  At around 10 p.m. on Saturday, April 25,  a park ranger  observed Travis RaySan ders, a 35-year-old Pahoa resident, operating a small quad-copter drone at the overlook next to Jaggar Museum. According to National Park spokesperson Jessica Ferracane, the ranger “contacted” the individual, who refused to identify himself and attempted to flee the scene. The Officer then used his Taser to subdue the suspect and took him into custody.  He was arrested for failure to comply with a lawful order and for interfering with agency functions, and taken for the night to the county detention center.  He was released on signature bond on Sunday morning. The the drone was returned to suspect’s family.

According to Ferracane,  the National Park System released rules last June making it illegal to operate an unmanned flying vehicle in any national park. The penalty for violating that rule is up to  six months in jail and a $5,000 fine