• 14 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    By Tiffany Edwards Hunt

    If you have any interest in one’s journey through “psychedelic inner worlds,” you’ll appreciate the autobiography of Pahoa resident George Douvris.

    Find “Crossing Karma Zones” at the Pahoa Used Books, Big Island Book Buyers, Kona Stories in Kailua-Kona, or on Amazon, with Kindle availability.

    “One of the best autobiographies of the year,” says Lee Underwood, the lead guitarist for Tim Buckley who wrote Buckley’s biography.

    Noting Douvris grew up in a traditional Greek household, Underwood says, “Early on, he became a gypsy soul who yearned for far-away places, exotic locales, and liberting points of view based on love, compassion, and deep respect for nature. Read the rest of this entry »

  • 14 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    By Sofia Wilt

    Move over kale, the next “it” vegetable according to food trendologist (yes, that is a profession) is surprisingly, cauliflower. This newfound affection for this humble vegetable is largely due to a rise of different grain-free and vegetable-centric food trends. With so many people having adverse health issues from wheat and other grains, gluten-free foods are increasingly popular – and some genius figured out how to use cauliflower in place of grains. Similarly, the “new” Paleo diet (a diet based on foods humans have adapted to for over 200,000 years versus newer foods from the recent advent of agriculture that are 10,000 years old or less) often showcase this extremely versatile vegetable. Plus, many people have simply been cutting back on carbohydrates to achieve weight loss and balance their blood sugar – and cauliflower can be substituted for many starchy favorites. Read the rest of this entry »

  • 14 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    By Sally June Taylor 

    Raw avocado pie is my favorie raw desert by far. Living in Hawaii we can easily get many of the ingredients. Working with raw nuts, dates, a coconut, avocados, lime and some other ingredients you can make an amazing key lime like pie. The final result is green, tangy, sweet, and delicious. I hope you like it too. Read the rest of this entry »

  • 14 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    wine glassBy Selene Alice Wayne

    Every once in a while, I get bored with the regular.

    For instance, malbecs are great, but I can only drink them for so long before I want a different taste, and not just a different brand of malbec, but a whole different wine. I’ll drink whites for a while, but that sauvignon blanc that was way too grassy pushes me away, too.

    When I’m in a funk like this, I go off the beaten path. I find a wine that is hard to pronounce upon first look and upon first taste, it’s indescribable. I don’t think it should be any more scary to pick a wine for its label than to pick it for its unknown name.  Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    ratBy Barbara Fahs

    When you hear the name “rat lungworm disease,” you might find it revolting. But the symptoms it creates, and the long-lasting physical effects, are even worse.

    First reported in Hawai‘i in the 1960s, rat lungworm and the disease it causes (Eosinophilic meningitis or angiostrongyliasis) have not been widely reported.

    Throughout Hawai‘i, only 42 cases have been reported since 2007, with 38 of them occurring on the Big Island. However, the Department of Health acknowledges that case numbers are probably higher, since diagnosis is difficult. According to Dr. Sue Jarvi of the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at UH Hilo, the disease “was originally discovered in Canton, China in the 1930’s… Since then it has spread to at least 30 countries, likely by rats on shipping vessels.”  Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    A Rat Lungworm Disease informational meeting is slated for 2 p.m., May 17 at the Pahoa Community Center (Pahoa Neighborhood Facility). Smiley Burrows arranged for researchers to be there. Sue Jarvi will be present.  She is expected to share information about the water tests.  Jarvi is also expected to share the need for at least 500 people to visit the Puna Community Medical Center and take blood, particularly people who have suffered with what they think may have been rat lungworm disease. Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    By Robert Duerr 

    In the Kumulipo, the sacred Hawaiian creation text, there is no mention of The Nature Conservancy (TNC).  Kamapu’a, half pua’a (pig) and half man, however has a featured role as a powerful force and Pele lover.  With the DLNR chair nomination of the Nature Conservancy’s executive director, Suzanne Case, hunters, fishermen and gatherers want to know if preservation tactics, like the eradication of the pua’a, will continue to remove food and tradition from Hawaii’s land and waters.

    To his credit Ige understood that DLNR is first and foremost a real estate development and leasing agency  responsible for 1.3 million acres of state land and  3 million acres of state ocean waters so Ching could work.   This with a meager 1% of the state for a total budget of $98.7 million.

    Then there is the added responsibility of managing 2 million acres of conservation district lands, water supply, fisheries, game animals, parks, reefs, endangered species, and Hawaii?s historic and cultural sites.  This with 834 employees on a payroll totaling $39 million is daunting task has often been an exercise in futility.

    Ching soon felt the slings and arrows of criticism because he was seen conflicted as a both real estate professional and lobbyist for Castle-Cooke.   Twenty environmental groups, including Sierra Club and the Outdoor Circle, surrounded wagons while a 7,500 MoveOn petition and a caustic nine hour hearing pelted Ching’s nomination into oblivion.  Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    Government transparency will be the subject of a June 18 Big Island Press Club Newsmaker Luncheon.

    Keli’i Akina, president of Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, and Joe Kent, the organization’s policy analyst, will review their work for better government, economy, and society in Hawaii.

    Grassroot Institute has been able to uncover what organization representatives describe as “amazing” information, which they intend to upload for journalists and the public at OpenHawaii.org. Among the findings:

    The top ten highest state public pensions for retirees last year. Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Arts, Island Events

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    By Tiffany Edwards Hunt

    I just watched and listened to the County of Hawaii Ethics Board hearing on a livestream broadcast.  The board, after much deliberation, deferred petition No. 2015-03.  The petition alleged Mayor Billy Kenoi and Finance Director Deannaimage Sako violated the ethics code as a result of the mayor’s alleged inappropriate p card spending and Sako’s alleged negligence and / or lack of oversight in the alleged inappropriate p card spending.

    Ethics board members ultimately decided to allow an Attorney General’s investigation to occur before they take up the matter. All that was fine and proper in my opinion.  What stood out to me, though, was the fact that Ken Goodenow, who is active in the Hawaii County Democratic Party and who is a former Hawaii County clerk, mid the chairman of the Ethics board and didn’t bother to recuse himself.  Whenever he would say something, I would think to myself, why didn’t he recuse himself from participating this meeting?  The appearance of impropriety on a meeting alleging impropriety is just the epitome of irony.

    When Goodenow called out Kerri Petersen Marks for filming the proceeding too close to where the Ethics board members were sitting, I just got unnerved.   Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

      By Alan McNarie

    One entity that stands to lose a great deal if the TMT is not built is the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, which is supposed to be getting a cut of revenues from ceded lands. So far, the University of Hawaii has stymied that mandate by leasing the land atop Mauna Kea for a dollar a year, and then signing similar dollar subleases with the various telescope consortia. But the TMT’s backers have, for the first time, agreed to pay rent: a million a year when the telescope is operational, of which 20 percent will go to OHA. So it was in OHA’s best interest, after the summit protests erupted, to offer its services as a mediator to both sides.   Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    By Kristine Kubat

    It’s easy to buy into the argument that proponents of the TMT represent the future while protectors of Mauna Kea cling to the past. Those coming to the debate through recent news reports find worldly scientists backing the project and parochial religious fanatics trying to stop it.  When more inquiring minds take to the Internet, they come up with reputable institutions dedicated to cutting edge science funding the TMT. Googling the “aloha aina movement,” they’re likely to end up down a rabbit hole where colonial powers illegally occupy a sovereign kingdom. TMT developers offer sleek computer renderings of a behemoth metallic structure; TMT thwarters carry little ti-leaf bundles they made by hand. Even the dichotomy that lands TMT advocates in the “for” category while pigeonholing those who stand for sacred sites as “against” makes the latter seem distastefully archaic.  And, BTW (LOL) didn’t the sentimentality that things were sacred die out a long, long time ago?

    Enough of what’s easy. . . let’s look at what’s right. Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    By Bobby Jean Leithead-Todd 

    Many of my friends are opposed to the construction of TMT.  While I can appreciate their angst over not just TMT but a host of cultural issues, I stand on the other side.  Astronomy has brought world-class scientists to the island.  One from Scotland lived down the street from us.  Another had children attending Kaumana Elementary.  They along with other astronomers, paid rent, spent their money in local stores and restaurants.  They mentored students in our local schools in the sciences, astronomy, and robotics.  They volunteered and helped in our science fairs.

    There are people arguing that astronomy has not contributed anything to our local community but contribution cannot be measured in just dollars and cents and jobs the industry created in construction or ongoing maintenance.  The contribution that these scientists make in education both at the university and in our schools is part of the equation too.  Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

    By Kristine Kubat

    It’s easy to buy into the argument that proponents of the TMT represent the future while protectors of Mauna Kea cling to the past. Those coming to the debate through recent news reports find worldly scientists backing the project and parochial religious fanatics trying to stop it.  When more inquiring minds take to the Internet, they come up with reputable institutions dedicated to cutting edge science funding the TMT. Googling the “aloha aina movement,” they’re likely to end up down a rabbit hole where colonial powers illegally occupy a sovereign kingdom. TMT developers offer sleek computer renderings of a behemoth metallic structure; TMT thwarters carry little ti-leaf bundles they made by hand. Even the dichotomy that lands TMT advocates in the “for” category while pigeonholing those who stand for sacred sites as “against” makes the latter seem distastefully archaic.  And, BTW (LOL) didn’t the sentimentality that things were sacred die out a long, long time ago?

    Enough of what’s easy. . . let’s look at what’s right. Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

     

    The Thirty Meter Telescope has recently been publicized as being the largest optical telescope on earth—most recently in a Honolulu Star-Advertiser that called it the “world’s largest telescope” without even adding the “optical” classifier—which  clearly erroneous; even the TMT is dwarfed by the 305 meter dish of the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rice, for instance.

    But if the TMT is ever the world’s largest optical telescope, it won’t be for long.  Read the rest of this entry »

  • 13 May 2015 /  Uncategorized

     

     By Noah Patterson Hanohano Dolim

    This essay serves to voice three important concerns I have related to the Thirty Meter Telescope project. I write this as a rebuttal to popular arguments in support of the construction of TMT, to offer constructive critique, as well as to encourage, and promote the continuation of further dialogue that includes all peoples, parties, and institutions. I also take this time to thank the individuals who reviewed this piece before it entered the public sphere.

    Read the rest of this entry »